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FWIW, Goo-Gone and other citrus based solvents are not much different 
than turpentine, and the petroleum equivalents.  A search for "MSDS and 
d-limonene" might be informative. d-limonene has the same effect on 
fatty tissues as many other solvents.  Since we all like to listen to 
sounds check out Leonard Lopate's show, "Dangerous Household Chemicals," 
<http://www.wnyc.org/shows/lopate/2009/feb/04/dangerous-household-chemicals/>

--greg schmitz
AMIPA
Anchorage Alaska

On 2011-01-14 20:31 PM, Lou Judson wrote:
> Goo-Gone should do it. Lemon based, not petrochemical.
>
> <L>
> Lou Judson
> Intuitive Audio
> 415-883-2689
>
> On Jan 14, 2011, at 9:02 PM, Mark Hendrix 78L wrote:
>
>> Hello, folks,
>>
>> I recently purchased an out-of-print CD and was dismayed by the 
>> condition. I
>> wanted to play it to see if it would even play through before 
>> contacting the
>> seller, but I noticed the "label" side (the side bearing the printing 
>> on the
>> disc itself) had once had a price sticker affixed to it. Someone had 
>> removed
>> this, leaving a sticky residue, which I would like to remove before 
>> playing
>> the CD.
>>
>> My question is whether it is even possible to do this without 
>> damaging the
>> CD. If it is not, I would rather return it without playing it for a full
>> refund. But if it is possible, I would appreciate advice. My thought 
>> would
>> be to use naphtha (lighter fluid) since I have used that successfully 
>> for
>> removing price stickers from LP covers and LP & 78 labels. But I know 
>> the
>> printed surface of the CD is not paper, and that damaging it can 
>> render the
>> CD unplayable. So I would be grateful for advice on how to 
>> proceed--is there
>> a chemically safe way to remove the sticker, without leaving a 
>> residue from
>> the cleaning fluid that will damage the CD surface over time? Or 
>> should I
>> just send the CD back as is?
>>
>> Many thanks,
>>
>> Mark Hendrix
>>