Print

Print


Yes, I'm sorry for the confusion. This is what I meant.

However, glass was/is very fragile, and often broke, which aluminum does 
not. And in the case of "A Conneticut Yankee" that is exactly what 
happened, and up until a recent time when a transferred magnetic tape 
was discovered, the only source for the recording were less than stellar 
disks pressed in the 1940s.

DrG

On 1/22/11 3:08 PM, George Brock-Nannestad wrote:
> From: Patent Tactics, George Brock-Nannestad
>
>
> Hello,
>
> Stewart Goodeman wrote [quote]:
>
>   I know in 1943, when they recorded the Rodgers and Hart
>> revival of "A Connecticut Yankee" they actually used glass.
>>
>
> ----- just to avert any confusion: glass means that the disc that supported
> the layer that the cut was made in was made of glass. The layer could have
> been lacquer, or it could have been wax, both were used. It has been thought
> that glass was a cheap substitute for aluminum that was the most used
> material for lacquer mastering discs, due to other uses for aluminum during
> the war. But in fact, the quality of the cut in glass-based discs was better
> than for aluminum, because the surface of glass was much smoother.
>
> This is very different from the use of glass in the manufacture of CDs; here
> the pits are really represented in the glass as a stage of manufacture.
>
> Kind regards,
>
>
> George
>