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Rock is not dead, it is everywhere in the media and entertainment. I have worked the smallest clubs to the largest venues nation wide for almost 30 years and it is as strong as ever. Internet living people still thrive on the live event. Crowds are mostly young for newer bands, packed sold out shows. Maybe it's just the bloated music industry itself is dying. Give me a vibrant band in a small or medium club anyday over a large concert tour. Many big shows are way over priced, though since I'm exposed to many different tours in my stagehand work, some acts do strive to put on a show that is worth the ticket. Djs are big, but some are mixing rock anyways, and the same crowd is at a live event the next night. Jukeboxes at the taverns I frequent are played non stop. And many people find out about new music on the radio, though it's often community, public, or online stations that they listen to these days. ANd yes, Bob Dylan's voice is shot, but his shows still rock, in some ways more than in the recent past even, he is playing electric guitar on stage again. I did get to see his last 2 tours for free, getting to setup his stage mikes on is local stops, but I watched the shows on my own time, while I often go home during a bloated tour stop that I'm not working the actual show call for. Music industry has changed, small stores close, but people still buy music and guitars. It's a fully DIY world now, maybe thats better,any money and fan feedback can reach the artists themselves now.

> Date: Tue, 4 Jan 2011 06:48:02 -0500
> From: [log in to unmask]
> Subject: [ARSCLIST] RIP rock n roll
> To: [log in to unmask]
> 
> http://www.jazzwax.com/2011/01/rock-and-roll-1949-2011.html
> 
> even if you don't agree with all of this essay, it's thought-provoking. I would have written an obit 
> for anything new and original called rock music 10 years ago, but Meyers makes a good point that the 
> Geriatric Stadium Tours (some actually sponsored by Viagara) kept filling the coffers and thus kept 
> rock in a living-dead zombie state for an extra decade. Personally, I find 60+ rockers spilling out 
> of their spandex and limping around a stadium with tickets costing over $100 more pathetic than all 
> the poseurs and copy-cats making up the "new" performers in the genre. At least a few of the "new" 
> performers are good musicians, worth listening to on that point alone. Rock is definitely a young 
> man's game, but two generations of young men (and women) have dropped the ball and just fed off the 
> old carcass. My theory -- rock got suburbanized and where is there any drama or struggle in a 
> suburban experience, so therefore no cause for new and rebelious musical directions.
> 
> Those of us who love rock and jazz, and for that matter blues, and lament the death of anything new 
> and original in any of those genres can at least revel in the fact that all three styles lived all 
> or most of their lives in the era of recordings and almost every "for the ages" song was captured on 
> a musically-satisfying recording at some point. I have enough CDs, LPs and downloads to keep me 
> rocking for the rest of my days, even if I'm keeping beat from a wheelchair.
> 
> -- Tom Fine