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Apologies just a typo--typing too fast.....

***should read "NOT" instead of "now"****which i typed below earlier-sorry! / kw

..."A final thought is
that there are so many weeks in a short quarter/semester
so one has to be approaching cataloging in the right way too so you
don't overwhelm students with overkill on too much --that is also
***now*** (read:NOT)
how an average cataloger works today either.  just thoughts...thanks
all & good luck !"

Cheers,
Karen Weaver, MLS
Electronic Resources Statistician, Duquesne University
Gumberg Library, Pittsburgh PA email: [log in to unmask] / Gmail:
[log in to unmask]




On 3/28/11, Karen Weaver <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> What is meant here by mentoring in record creation?
>
> that could mean many things also
>
> I'm not aware of record creation being a dominant mode in teaching
> cataloging , however, what I find most important is to get students
> and instructor both starting to think about the cataloging process and
> records which also goes hand in hand at least from my view with the
> theory and national standards used.  I personally come from many years
> as a practitioner also which I think does make a difference also in
> how it is taught.
>
> I'm also not clear on how you are defining "practicum" here for those
> of us who are not familiar with how each person may use it.  Do you
> mean students who do internships in copy cataloging work? or interns
> who just sit in cataloging units updating holding records etc
> there are many different perspectives also on what one considers
> actual "cataloging"
> What I find is important is for graduate students to be able to put
> themselves out there for entry level cataloging positions and gain
> interest in the work done.  When they do not know what options are
> actually available to them, they also do not know where to even begin.
> I try to remind students also that what they may have done last year
> for a few weeks for a few hours updating a record, is not the same as
> a professional cataloging position somewhere per se, and that they
> need to know the many types of opportunities that are out there in
> this area.  They are coming in already competing with others out there
> usually with several years experience as well, which very often will
> be asked for in job descriptions.  We also get many students who just
> think of "cataloging" as copying vendor records into a database and
> putting the barcode on the book and thats it. Someone may have an
> interest today at the moment as a school media librarian only, and
> often they would say that they didn't feel it was necessary to learn
> XYZ as much as say in an academic/research library, these are some of
> the many differences whenyou teach also, some students will take more
> interest than others, thats true in all courses.  I try to remind them
> that down the road, 2-5 years from now, they may find themselves with
> an opportunity in a different area etc  Also many come with already
> experience in specialized type libraries-sciences, medical etc  and so
> on.
>
> I am not sure if I'd call it the dominant mode at all re: creating
> records--I would describe it more of thinking about how information is
> actually organized and why-at a base level.
> Many if not most are amazed when they see what standards have been
> created by catalogers for years, of course today we hear it as
> something "new".
>
> You have to have both--you have to be able to think about the
> organizational aspect and why/how as well as the nitty gritty parts.
> Its challenging for the right type of person, many also just get
> frustrated adn what something very simple to do-that will be the types
> of positions they will seek out maybe and nothing else.   In that case
> cataloging work is not for them.  It's a competitive field with many
> seasoned and skilled people out there as you know already.  When
> hiring, libraries also know what to look for in the new graduates
> coming into the field and looking for positions.  Many also will ask
> what they actually learned in library school too....A final thought is
> that there are so many weeks in a short quarter/semester
> so one has to be approaching cataloging in the right way too so you
> don't overwhelm students with overkill on too much --that is also now
> how an average cataloger works today either.  just thoughts...thanks
> all & good luck !
>
> Cheers,
> Karen Weaver, MLS
> Electronic Resources Statistician, Duquesne University
> Gumberg Library, Pittsburgh PA email: [log in to unmask] / Gmail:
> [log in to unmask]
>
>
> On 3/28/11, Cheryl Tarsala <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>> I've always wondered why our dominant mode of teaching cataloging is
>> mentoring in record creation, with quantity (keeping up with feedback)
>> always being the main discussion about teaching. Is a graduate-level
>> cataloging course different from (or the same as) a practicum? Should
>> it be?
>>
>> *****************
>> Cheryl Tarsala
>> [log in to unmask]
>>
>