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On May 26, 2011, at 8:19 AM, Elizabeth Perkes wrote:

> It seems I'm not explaining the problem well. In our database, information about agencies, functions, and series are  independent of each other (not a true parent/child relationship), yet linked together so that we know which series were created within what context or associated with what government functions. When you do searches, you can navigate within or between any of them. When someone does searches within the agency table, I'd like them to understand exactly what it is they are interacting with, especially since search results there would bring up agency histories as opposed to series records. I'm also thinking about how traditional library catalogs work, where people understand the difference between searching by author vs. searching the contents found within a book. Surely there is a distinction there that should be made clear to the end user. With faceted searching, the number of hits associated with the agency/function/series categories are listed, and then within the category you can narrow your search further, or do cross-category searches. For people searching for a name anywhere in the database, calling something a "name" would probably suffice. But the question is, what do I call the agency table that has all of the EAC information?
> 

So the issue is that your "agency" table only has EAC-type info for "agencies" that you collect records for rather than EAC-type info for all the names (CP or F) in your database?  It seems like your case might be pretty specific in that you only have EAC-type info for creators and your creators happen to all be agencies?  Why not use a label that is specific to your context such as "agency" then if that is all you have EAC records for?