Print

Print


Just a little thing I'd reccomend, get a $2 outlet tester and just make 
sure the ground plug at the outlet is actually grounded. in older homes 
they sometimes are not. People usually assume that just because there 
are 3 prongs that they're good and that's not the case.

-- 
Thatcher Graham
Senior Field Engineer
Mediaguide



On 8/29/2011 3:56 PM, Jan Myren wrote:
> HI!
>
> I have sometimes problems with "ground" hum from the power on my set-up.
> The problems are most often with my 78 rpm turnable playback system
> consisting of a Rek-O-Kut turnable, Pro-Ject pre-amp, Packburn 323A and
> Rek-O-Kut re equalizer and de-hisser. It is not quite permanent.
> BUT; when it sometimes appear it seems like it also make the music signals
> sound distorted, especially at the end of the records.
>
> May such hum also have something to say for the music signals, like
> distortion, maybe, or will it just cause that "famous" "ground" problems hum
> sound from the loudspeakers?
>
> All the best
> Jan
>
> -----Opprinnelig melding-----
> Fra: Association for Recorded Sound Discussion List
> [mailto:[log in to unmask]] På vegne av Goran Finnberg
> Sendt: 29. august 2011 19:48
> Til: [log in to unmask]
> Emne: [ARSCLIST] Dawn of Digital update -- at long last, clarity on Philips'
> digital first
>
> Tom Fine:
>
>> A former Soundstream employee finally set the record
>> straight on this. Philips' first all-digital release
>> on LP was John Williams "Pops In Space," 1980. The
>> original LP has a banner across it stating "FIRST
>> Philips Digital Recording." Philips' engineers wanted
>> to use a digital recorder they had developed, according
>> to this person. But the record's producer, George Korngold,
>> had used Soundstream the previous year to record the
>> soundtrack to "Kings Row" and requested Soundstream be
>> used on the Philips session.
> http://www.mancini99.freeserve.co.uk/Michael_Mailes.html
>
> DECCA recording engineer Michaels Mailes says:
>
> Interesting perhaps to note that in 1980 John Williams
> became musical director of The Boston Pops orchestra.
> I had made recordings with Arthur Fiedler/Boston Pops
> and had experience working in Symphony Hall.
>
> Philips made a contract to record J.W and found that
> they didn't have equipment or crew in America at the
> time of the 1st proposed recording date. Decca had
> recording equipment in the States having made contracts
> with several orchestras. Logical conclusion! Ask Decca!
>
> Together with Stanley Goodall (Recording engineer) we
> made J.W's first recording; 'Pops In Space'
> recorded on the Soundstream system.
>
> -----------------------------
>
> So it would seem that this disk was not only done on the Soundstream system
> but was also engineered by Michael Mailes and Stanley Goodall of the
> DECCA/London company using their Neumann M50 tree technique and equipment
> feeding the Soundstream digital recorder.
>
>> Philips' engineers wanted to use a
>> digital recorder they had developed,
> I really do not think that this is correct.
>
> Philips recording centre never had any plans making their own digital
> recorder as did DECCA/London.
>
> http://www.mancini99.freeserve.co.uk/Decca_1.html
>
> Philips used the Sony 1610 converter with a suitable video recorder in the
> very beginning as did most everyone else.
>
> Later on they moved on using the dcs 900 converter.
>