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sort of off topic but  I still use the Decca tree as my main classical 
music recording technique. Fantastic results, almost zero effort.
Shai

On 02/09/2011 21:36, Goran Finnberg wrote:
> Roger Kulp:
>
>> I don't think you are talking about
>> the classic "Decca Tree",are you?
> Indeed I was speaking about the DECCA tree.
>
>> I don't think it was used on the
>> early Decca digital recordings.
> The DECCA tree was in steady use up to the demise of the DECCA/London
> recording centre demise in december 1997.
>
>> I have a copy of LDR-10001-2 ("New Year's in Vienna!") right here.
> That used Schoeps microphones in their black versions to avoid reflection
> glare from the spotlights used by the TV crew.
>
> That event was described in detail in one of the English HiFi magazines by
> Angus McKenzie who had spoken to the recording engineer in charge, James
> Lock.
>
> It was being stated quite clearly that the main microphone pick up used the
> DECCA tree populated with Schoeps omni microphones. Together with necessary
> extra spot microphones as deemed necessary by the recording crew.
>
>> The cover shows two microphones,at the ends of what must
>> have been very long cables,that snaked back and forth over
>> the orchestra.They were so low,that a flautist,and a
>> clarinetist,might have hit their heads on them,if they were
>> not careful when they stood up.Almost like a two microphone
>> twist,on the Mercury single microphone technique.
> It must be remembered that the New Years concert by the Vienna Philharmonic
> is being miked by at least three recording organizations.
>
> Austrian TV and also Austrian Radio together with the latest record company
> interested in recording and releasing the event on compact disk.
>
> The whole event is being rebroadcasted over the whole of Europe by the
> European Broadcating Union, EBU, so is a main event for literally millions
> of people on January 1st.
>
> So you might count well above 50 microphones in use by the above three
> recording teams.
>
> An informed guess is that the two microphones you saw in the record picture
> was spot microphones over the winds put there by any of the recording crews.
>
> In fact the mics in question might also have been put there but was never
> used at all because when listening to the main microphones there was enough
> winds in there so the spots was not needed at all.
>
> Anything you see in pictures may or may not mean a thing.
>