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The September 2011 issue of Black Grooves has now been posted at www.blackgrooves.org.

This month is devoted to Black rock, beginning with a look at the new book The Chitlin' Circuit and the Road to Rock 'n' Roll by Preston Lauterbach, who utilized material from our collections. Several new rock-oriented albums are also reviewed, including poet-singer Saul Williams' Volcanic Sunlight, Black Joe Lewis and the Honeybears' Scandalous, King's X Live Love in London, Joan Armatrading Live at the Royal Albert Hall, and the soulful Ruthie Foster Live at Antone's. Jazz-oriented releases include Mary Lou Williams at Rick's Café Americain, the Rebirth Brass Band's Rebirth of New Orleans, and Knives From Heaven, a collaboration between Matthew Ship, William Parker, and hip hop artists Hprizm and Beans. Reissues include Highlife Time 2: Nigerian & Ghanaian Classics from the Golden Years and, from the Numero Group, Willie Wright's Telling the Truth and the long-lost album by Father's Children Who's Gonna Save The World.  Wrapping up this issue is the gospel rap album Rehab: The Overdose by Lecrae and A Waterlogged Soul Kitchen by reggae artist Taj Weekes.

Note:  though September is Gospel Music Heritage Month (at least unofficially<http://thomas.loc.gov/cgi-bin/query/z?c112:H.J.RES.64:>), we are delaying our celebration until November to coincide with our upcoming one-day conference/performance Why We Sing:  Indianapolis Gospel Music in Church, Community and Industry, to be held November 12, 2011, at Indiana University. Details to be announced shortly.


Brenda Nelson-Strauss
Editor, Black Grooves
Archives of African American Music & Culture
Indiana University
2805 E. 10th Street, Suite 180
Bloomington, IN 47408
www.blackgrooves.org
http://www.indiana.edu/~aaamc/
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