Print

Print


Interesting comment. I'll dig out my copy and see how it fares today. David and Linda LaFlamme are neighbors of mine, and couple of months ago they sang "our greatest hit" at a 75th birthday party for another friend (Dr Elmo of Grandma got run over by a reindeer fame). Amazingly, they did a wonderful job of it, as it moved me and the whole room full of professional musicians tremendously! 
 I'll pass I. The indirect compliment next time I see them.

L
Sent from my Verizon  iPhone 4 
Personal Communicator
Mobile 415-271-8070

On Dec 15, 2011, at 1:03 PM, Lou Houck <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> To my ears, the best sounding LP I ever acquired was the "White Bird" album by It's a Beautiful Day.
> I don't know if it was an excellent job of recording or mastering, or if I got Number One off the
> stamper, but it was breathtaking.  I bought an early import CD of that album and it paled by comparison.
> Just my dos centavos.
> 
> Lou Houck
> Rollin' Recording
> Boerne, TX
> 
> 
> 
> ----- Original Message ----- From: Tom Fine
> To: [log in to unmask]
> Sent: Thursday, December 15, 2011 2:18 PM
> Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] Straight Line Tracking was Stanton Turntable reviews....anyone?
> 
> 
> This is an exaggeration. There were plenty of good pop and rock records cut over the years, with
> nice-sounding top end. It's possible to do and was possible to do from the earliest days of
> close-mic recording. Also, as some subsequent CD reissues have clearly demonstrated, some of the
> distortion heard on some recordings came from either overloaded microphones (sticking a
> high-sensitivity European condenser mic real close to a loud sound source is not a good idea) or
> overloaded electronics (typical American mic preamps of the "golden era" were not designed for
> high-output condenser mics placed close to loud sources, they were designed for lower-output ribbon
> mics) or poor mixing decisions leading to saturated tape. One example on how to do all of this right
> are the best sounding Contemporary Records albums done by Roy DuNann. He used a passive mixer,