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I'm a SACD owner and I love the format, especially the multi-channel
mixes.  I love to remove all the channels except the center one and listen
to the singer. Elton John, Billy Joel and Karen Carpenter are favorites.
It's like you are in the control room while they are doing their vocal
tracks, and you are soloing their mic. You almost hear their heartbeats.
I think one of the problems with SACD, is that you have to sit in the sweet
spot and do nothing else but allow the music to engulf you.
I remember as a teenager, when a good album would come out, we would sit
down and listen to it. Just listen - nothing else. Think back to Sgt
Pepper. Nowadays, few people have the luxury of taking the time to sit down
and do nothing else but listen.  We listen to music in our cars while
driving, in our homes while preparing supper, on our Walkman while walking,
jogging, reading, riding the subway, etc. but we rarely have the time to
sit down and focus on the music being played, on the recording itself. And
apart from easy file downloads and exchange, the MP3 format has become a
background music generator while we do other things.
Q sound was also a format the demanded that you sit motionless in the exact
sweet spot to enjoy the 3D effect. No wonder it never caught on. Time is a
luxury today and not too many people want to "waste" it listening to music
only.  Our world has changed, unfortunately. We have become multitask human
beings with not enough hours in a day to do it all.

Louis

2012/1/31 Tom Fine <[log in to unmask]>

> As I understand it (and I may well understand it incorrectly), there is
> only one SACD production line left, at a Sony plant in Japan. Somebody
> reported, maybe on this list, that Sony took out SACD manufacturing
> capability from Indiana a couple of years ago.
>
> Question, Eric -- do the Japanese like SACD multi-channel or 2-channel?
>
> One of my opinions about why SACD flopped is that Sony took their eye off
> a superior 2-channel product and then the multi-channel stuff was so
> inconsistent and then there are decades of proof that mass numbers of
> consumers won't do multi-channel. They should have left multi-channel to
> the DVD world and stuck with a superior 2-channel product, working with
> manufacturers to get player costs down quickly, like they did with CD's. I
> think the whole cause of higher-rez digital suffered because there wasn't a
> big enough market for SACD and DVD to have a format war, and hybrid SACD's
> weren't ready for 2 years. If they had come out with SACD as superior
> 2-channel and line-priced it with CD until the hybrid discs came out, I bet
> they'd have had better uptake in the marketplace, which would have meant
> SACD/CD players would have evolved faster and cheaper, which would have
> propelled the virtuous circle of greater uptake.
>
> -- Tom Fine
>
> ----- Original Message ----- From: "Eric Nagamine" <[log in to unmask]>
> To: <[log in to unmask]>
> Sent: Tuesday, January 31, 2012 4:42 AM
> Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] Mercury 51-CD box set now officially set for USA
> and Europe markets
>
>
>  Gray, Mike wrote:
>>
>>> SACD is still alive in Japan - cf. Exton (really a vanity label, but
>>> still releasing every month) and EMI-Japan's 50 SACD's from their
>>> deep analog catalog.
>>>
>>>
>>> Mike Gray
>>>
>>
>> EMI Japan has another 50 SACD titles due out by March.  Universal Japan is
>> issuing single layer SACDs and Esoteric/Teac is issuing some EMI and
>> Universal licensed materials on SACD. EMI also has bunch of Furtwangler &
>> Casals mono SACDs issued.
>>
>> -----------
>> Aloha and Mahalo,
>>
>> Eric Nagamine
>>
>>