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Indeed, I was looking this up for a different reason; not an answer to your
question, but a related format:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Auricon

Dave Lewis
Lebanon, OH

On Thu, Feb 9, 2012 at 8:37 AM, Tom Fine <[log in to unmask]>wrote:

> I think I found most of my answer, in an obvious place ;) ...
>
> http://www.aes.org/aeshc/docs/**smpte/movie.sound/kellogg-**history3.pdf<http://www.aes.org/aeshc/docs/smpte/movie.sound/kellogg-history3.pdf>
> see page 432 onward.
>
> Summary: SMPE meets to discuss magnetic recording right after WWII; in
> 1947, DuPont develops mag-coated film and RCA develops a retrofit kit for
> one of their 35mm optical recorders; by 1951, RCA had developed 1, 2 and
> 3-track magnetic-film recorders and Columbia Pictures was using that
> equipment (and then printing to optical for editing!). Also in 1951,
> Westrex reported developing magnetic recorders for various track layouts
> and various film widths. The SMPE Progress Report of 1952 reports that by
> the end of 1951, "approximately 75% of the original production recording,
> music scoring and dubbing in Hollywood was being done on magnetic-recording
> equipment."
>
> Kellogg, always worth checking for the history of anything
> sound-for-picture up to the mid-50's! The full article is linked from here:
> http://www.aes.org/aeshc/docs/**smpte/movie.sound/audio_**
> engineering_in_motion_**pictures.html<http://www.aes.org/aeshc/docs/smpte/movie.sound/audio_engineering_in_motion_pictures.html>
>
> -- Tom Fine
>
> ----- Original Message ----- From: "Tom Fine" <[log in to unmask]
> >
> To: <[log in to unmask]>
> Sent: Thursday, February 09, 2012 8:15 AM
> Subject: [ARSCLIST] Early 35mm magnetic film history in Hollywood
>
>
>
>  Hello ARSC brain trust:
>>
>> Does someone know exactly when folks in Hollywood started using
>> magnetic-coated film in their sound recordings? I found this article from a
>> Dolby executive:
>> http://www.**cinematechnologymagazine.com/**pdf/dion%20sound.pdf<http://www.cinematechnologymagazine.com/pdf/dion%20sound.pdf>
>> which seems to put the date around 1952, with the development of
>> Cinerama, which apparently used stripe-coated magnetic tracks. I think
>> Westrex developed its stripe-coat and full-coat recorders around that same
>> time, and that magnetic recording of master tracks started to become common
>> as the various widescreen formats developed in the early 1950's. Is this
>> historically correct?
>>
>> Thanks in advance for your input.
>>
>> -- Tom Fine
>>
>