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The excellent Time-Life 6LP plus color hardcover book set "To The Moon," produced by Micky Kapp, 
contains some early Russian space program sounds, as well as much American audio. Copies go 
modest-priced on eBay. To me it's worth owning for the book and album artwork, it's a really neat 
historical document. Also for Soviet space audio, check science textbook publishers form the 60's 
and late 50's. Sometimes 10" or 7" long-play records were included in the books, later Evatone 
Soundsheets.

-- Tom Fine

----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Steven Smolian" <[log in to unmask]>
To: <[log in to unmask]>
Sent: Thursday, February 23, 2012 11:41 AM
Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] Sputnik in Orbit


>I have a Russian 7" disc of Yuri Gagarin's flight.  I don't doubt that there
> was a similar record for the sound of Sputnik and, perhaps one of Laika
> barking from way above.  Perhaps Mike Biel has them in his Russian
> collection.
>
> Steve Smolian
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Association for Recorded Sound Discussion List
> [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of David Lewis
> Sent: Thursday, February 23, 2012 11:01 AM
> To: [log in to unmask]
> Subject: [ARSCLIST] Sputnik in Orbit
>
> "Teams of visual observers at 150 stations in the United States and other
> countries were alerted during the night to watch for the Soviet sphere at
> dawn and during the evening twilight. They had been organized in Project
> Moonwatch <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Project_Moonwatch> to sight the
> satellite through binoculars or telescopes as it passed
> overhead.[56]<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sputnik_1#cite_note-CR-55>The
> USSR asked radio amateurs and commercial stations to record the sound of the
> satellite on magnetic tape<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magnetic_tape>
> .[56] <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sputnik_1#cite_note-CR-55>
> News reports at the time pointed out that "anyone possessing a short wave
> receiver can hear the new Russian earth satellite as it hurtles over his
> area of the globe". Directions, provided by the American Radio Relay
> League<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_Radio_Relay_League>were
> to "Tune in 20 megacycles sharply, by the time signals, given on that
> frequency. Then tune to slightly higher frequencies. The 'beep, beep' sound
> of the satellite can be heard each time it rounds the
> globe,"[57]<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sputnik_1#cite_note-56>The
> first recording of
> *Sputnik 1*'s signal was made by RCA
> <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RCA>engineers near Riverhead, Long Island.
> They then drove the tape recording into Manhattan for broadcast to the
> public over NBC<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NBC>radio. However, as
> *Sputnik* rose higher over the East Coast, its signal was picked up by ham
> station W2AEE, the ham radio station of Columbia
> University<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Columbia_University>.
> Students working in the university's FM station,
> WKCR<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/WKCR>,
> made a tape of this, and were the first to rebroadcast the *Sputnik 1*signal
> to the American public (or such of it as could receive the FM station). The
> next morning two FBI <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/FBI>agents took the tape
> from the station. It has never been returned."
>
> -- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sputnik_1
>
>>>>>
>
> I wonder what happened to WKCR's tape of Sputnik, and of course why the FBI
> would want to seize it, apart from general Cold War paranoia.
>
> Also note near the close of the article the presence of a fake Sputnik I
> recording, courtesy of NASA. Why would we need to circulate something like
> this?
>
> David N. "Uncle Dave" Lewis
> Lebanon, OH
>