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I have a Russian 7" disc of Yuri Gagarin's flight.  I don't doubt that there
was a similar record for the sound of Sputnik and, perhaps one of Laika
barking from way above.  Perhaps Mike Biel has them in his Russian
collection.

Steve Smolian

-----Original Message-----
From: Association for Recorded Sound Discussion List
[mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of David Lewis
Sent: Thursday, February 23, 2012 11:01 AM
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: [ARSCLIST] Sputnik in Orbit

"Teams of visual observers at 150 stations in the United States and other
countries were alerted during the night to watch for the Soviet sphere at
dawn and during the evening twilight. They had been organized in Project
Moonwatch <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Project_Moonwatch> to sight the
satellite through binoculars or telescopes as it passed
overhead.[56]<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sputnik_1#cite_note-CR-55>The
USSR asked radio amateurs and commercial stations to record the sound of the
satellite on magnetic tape<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magnetic_tape>
.[56] <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sputnik_1#cite_note-CR-55>
News reports at the time pointed out that "anyone possessing a short wave
receiver can hear the new Russian earth satellite as it hurtles over his
area of the globe". Directions, provided by the American Radio Relay
League<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_Radio_Relay_League>were
to "Tune in 20 megacycles sharply, by the time signals, given on that
frequency. Then tune to slightly higher frequencies. The 'beep, beep' sound
of the satellite can be heard each time it rounds the
globe,"[57]<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sputnik_1#cite_note-56>The
first recording of
*Sputnik 1*'s signal was made by RCA
<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RCA>engineers near Riverhead, Long Island.
They then drove the tape recording into Manhattan for broadcast to the
public over NBC<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NBC>radio. However, as
*Sputnik* rose higher over the East Coast, its signal was picked up by ham
station W2AEE, the ham radio station of Columbia
University<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Columbia_University>.
Students working in the university's FM station,
WKCR<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/WKCR>,
made a tape of this, and were the first to rebroadcast the *Sputnik 1*signal
to the American public (or such of it as could receive the FM station). The
next morning two FBI <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/FBI>agents took the tape
from the station. It has never been returned."

-- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sputnik_1

>>>>

I wonder what happened to WKCR's tape of Sputnik, and of course why the FBI
would want to seize it, apart from general Cold War paranoia.

Also note near the close of the article the presence of a fake Sputnik I
recording, courtesy of NASA. Why would we need to circulate something like
this?

David N. "Uncle Dave" Lewis
Lebanon, OH