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Tom:

The problems were typical SSS. When I say recent vintage, I meant the 
mid-to-late eighties (yeah, I guess that isn't recent any longer!). I 
don't have batch numbers from the client material handy, but I think we 
still have a few virgin  10 1/2" reels of some 206 with similar issues 
in our samples. Would have to check and see.

--Scott

On 2/17/2012 5:25 PM, Tom Fine wrote:
> Hi Scott:
>
> Can you describe exactly the problems you've had with Scotch 206 and 
> 208? And do you have actual manufacture dates? When you say "recent 
> vintage," it can't be any more recent than about 20 years old, right? 
> Didn't 3M get out of the tape business in the early 90's? To be 
> honest, I didn't know they were still making 206 and 208 in the end, I 
> thought they had discontinued those in the 80's, and they were down to 
> just 226/227 and 250 in the last years.
>
> I have some virgin 206 from a very late batch here (got it from MRL a 
> few years ago, they had long before switched to SM911).
>
> -- Tom Fine
>
> ----- Original Message ----- From: "Scott D. Smith" 
> <[log in to unmask]>
> To: <[log in to unmask]>
> Sent: Friday, February 17, 2012 1:41 PM
> Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] AGFA PE46 problems
>
>
>> Interesting exchange. Based on the comments in this thread, it would 
>> appear that my suspicions over the years regarding the variance in 
>> quality control at various manufacturing facilities around the world 
>> is justified.
>>
>> FWIT: Although I have experienced shedding issues with various tapes 
>> manufactured by both AGFA and BASF, I don't believe I have ever 
>> encountered any issues with binder breakdown. I have also had 
>> extensive experience with AGFA and BASF magnetic film stocks, both in 
>> production use and archival transfers. During the 1970's these were 
>> some of the most consistent stocks we encountered. We recently 
>> transferred a number of reels of AGFA acetate base stock from the 
>> early 1970's, which had excellent wind characteristics, virtually no 
>> shedding, and only very minimal VS.
>>
>> On the other hand, I recently transferred some 1/4" and 1" reels of 
>> 3M 206 and 208, some of which was of fairly recent vintage, and all 
>> of the material exhibited problems with binder breakdown (all of it 
>> was stored in good vault conditions). Go figure....
>>
>> --Scott
>>
>> Scott D. Smith CAS
>> Chicago Audio Works, Inc.
>>
>> On 2/17/2012 11:38 AM, Goran Finnberg wrote:
>>> Shai Drori:
>>>
>>>> after years of using BASF tapes I never ran across a bad batch.
>>> Agreed 100%
>>>
>>>> There were obviously better and worse tapes but after working
>>>> with them 10-30 years ago and now digitizing them, not a single
>>>> tape that needed baking or treatment.
>>> Agreed 100%
>>>
>>> Swedish Radio is at the moment transferring about 300 000 tapes, mostly
>>> BASF, to digital and so far after 2 years of doing transfers there 
>>> has not
>>> been one single case of any BASF tapes needing baking.
>>>
>>> The work is supposed to end in summer 2013 with 25 people working 
>>> two shifts
>>> each day for total 16 hours work each day.
>>>
>>> All tape machines are Studer. A807, A812 and A820.
>>>
>>>> Weird.
>>> Not so.
>>>
>>> Dipl.-Ing = Msc EE Günther Dreher of the BASF Applications 
>>> Engineering Dept.
>>> Audio-Tape pointed out to me that BASF is the biggest Chemical 
>>> Company in
>>> the word with more than 150 000 people employed wordwide in the mid 
>>> 80´s.
>>>
>>> The magnetic tape department was like an almost nonexistent drop in the
>>> ocean that is BASF.
>>>
>>> That the magnetic tape division went belly up meant nothing to the 
>>> colossus
>>> that is BASF.
>>>
>>> Günther Dreher told me that BASF was the only company in the world 
>>> that made
>>> ALL the chemical parts contained in the slurry that was coated onto the
>>> polyester backing.
>>>
>>> No other company in the world had this advantage and had to relay on 
>>> buying
>>> what they needed from external sources.
>>>
>>> This meant that BASF had total control on every single part in the 
>>> slurry.
>>> Which was NOT the case for the competition as the external sources 
>>> would not
>>> reveal in exact detail what was being sold.
>>>
>>> And the condition that led up to the sticky shed debacle was well 
>>> known and
>>> understood by the chemical engineers at the magnetic tape division 
>>> according
>>> to Günther Dreher.
>>>
>>> His claim was that "You will never see any BASF magnetic tape go 
>>> sticky shed
>>> ever"
>>>
>>> So far his claims appear totally true to me.
>>>
>>
>