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From: Patent Tactics, George Brock-Nannestad


Hello Andrew,

you are right about Pyral (originally the trademark of Societé des Vernis 
Pyrolac in France, an automobile varnish manufacturer).

However, the father-mother-son analogy has a bit more to do with procreation 
than you would think. The father indeed has a protruding bit (the ridge that 
is the negative of a groove), and the mother a mating surface. So, you might 
say that in DMM the mother is directly impregnated.

Best wishes,


George



> Pyral may be the inventor of the nitrocellulose lacquer alu disc,  
> used for transcription, instantaneous playback, and parts  
> grandmothering (since the matrix is, technically, the "father").   In  
> any event, the ones made, today, by Apollo Masters (both their own  
> recipe blanks and those of the Transco brand, which they also now  
> make) are n-c lacquer on alu.
> 
> As far as danger, this should be treated with the same care one would  
> treat fingernail polish (don't add acetone) - but the cut-away swarf  
> - or "chip" - which is stringy, and dry, is the kindling kind of  
> substance which behaves not unlike its brother - magician's flash paper.
> 
> It's certainly more fun to say that one is going to cut an  
> "acetate."    To say, "...cut a dub," sounds like one is going to  
> emulate King Tubby. since the same word, Dub, implies a musical genre.
> 
> 
> 
> - Andrew
> 
> 
> 
> On Feb 29, 2012, at 1:01 PM, Steve Greene wrote:
> 
> > I think acetate was used "in parallel" mainly as an office dictation
> > format, I've seen "Memovox" discs, Edison Voicewriter and Gray  
> > Audograph
> > discs in our collections.  All are very thin, the Memovox discs  
> > tend to
> > be warped and brittle.  Based on the "sample" I have access to,  
> > lacquer
> > discs took over in the mid 1930's, replacing solid metal discs of
> > aluminum or zinc, or solid shellac discs.  Shellac continued to be  
> > used
> > for commercial pressings and some transcription discs through the
> > 1950's, where it was replaced by vinyl.
> >
> > I too am under the impression that the lacquer used on laminated discs
> > was cellulose nitrate.
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > Steve Greene
> > Archivist
> > Office of Presidential Libraries
> > National Archives and Records Administration
> > (301) 837-1772
> >>>> Andrew Hamilton <[log in to unmask]> 2/29/2012 11:59 AM >>>
> > I thought it was the other way around.   Acetate was replaced by
> > nitrocellulose lacquer, but the name, acetate, lives on...
> >
> >
> > From Wackypedia:
> >
> > "Despite their name, most acetate discs do not contain any acetate.
> > Instead, most are an aluminum disc with a coating of nitrocellulose
> > lacquer."
> >
> > Lacquer masters and dubs remain highly flammable - especially after
> > near-vaporization by a heated stylus.   The swarf must be removed
> > carefully from the chip jar (which also has some water in its
> > bottom).    Then you take a huge clump outdoors and ignite it - using
> >
> > a 10 foot match.    Weeeeeeeee!
> >
> >
> >
> > Andrew
> >
> >
> > (P.S., I visited the DDR in 1983.   Beautiful to see no
> > advertisements or other vestige of decadent capitalism.   Sigh.)
> >
> >
> > On Feb 29, 2012, at 9:53 AM, Dennis Rooney wrote:
> >
> >> Although the first instantaneous blanks were cellulose nitrate, the
> >
> >> formula
> >> was later changed to cellulose acetate, hence the use of "acetate"
> >> as a
> >> cognomen for discs which are properly called "lacquer(s)". The
> >> change was
> >> prompted by some unfortunate accidents involving mastering
> >> engineers who
> >> smoked while cutting lacquers. The vast majority of surviving
> >> lacquer discs
> >> are cellulose acetate. No worries (at least not about
> > combustibility).
> >>
> >> DDR
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >> On Wed, Feb 29, 2012 at 9:20 AM, Steve Greene
> >> <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> >>
> >>> Hello,
> >>> First time poster here.  How big a concern is the storage of
> >>> transcription
> >>> recordings, a majority of which are made of coated cellulose
> > nitrate
> >>> lacquer? Coming from a moving image background, the "n" word
> >>> (NITRATE) is
> >>> scary, though presumably the volume of nitrate in even a large
> >>> collection
> >>> of coated discs is tiny compared to even a small collection of
> >>> nitrate
> >>> film.  Were there components in the "recipe" for nitrate lacquer
> > that
> >>> tended to make them less combustible?
> >>>
> >>> Thanks in advance for your advice, perspectives.
> >>>
> >>>
> >>>
> >>>
> >>>
> >>>
> >>> Steve Greene
> >>> Archivist
> >>> Office of Presidential Libraries
> >>> National Archives and Records Administration
> >>> (301) 837-1772
> >>>
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >> -- 
> >> Dennis D. Rooney
> >> 303 W. 66th Street, 9HE
> >> New York, NY 10023
> >> 212.874.9626
> >
> > Serif Sound  CD Premastering
> >  Dingbat Lacquer Sound Disc
> > Andrew Hamilton, clerk
> > 1 (513) 542-3555
> > www.serifsound.com
> 
> Serif Sound  CD Premastering
>  Dingbat Lacquer Sound Disc
> Andrew Hamilton, clerk
> 1 (513) 542-3555
> www.serifsound.com