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Joyce - that is a VERY cool approach.  Thanks for all the detail!

Michele

From: Encoded Archival Description List [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Joyce Chapman
Sent: Thursday, February 16, 2012 4:14 PM
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: Re: Digitized objects provided in bulk from the finding aid (easy as 1, 2, 3?)

The Southern Historical Collection at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill has about 270,000 digital objects from 416 different collections linked directly from finding aids. These are not easily downloaded in bulk, but the system for digitization and linking digital content is low cost and simple. Content is linked at the folder level, and there is no additional item-level metadata created for digital objects, they simply inherit the folder-level metadata. This system was developed as part of a program called the "Digital Southern Historical Collection," which is a large-scale digitization program with no end date. The goal is the digitization of the entire holdings of the SHC.

The two main components of the delivery system for the Digital SHC are the online finding aid and CONTENTdm Digital Collection Management Software. The HTML finding aid serves as the main discovery platform for digitized content, which resides in CONTENTdm. The decision to use finding aids as the main access point was made based on feedback from patrons who expect to be able to shift seamlessly between online description and digital content.

In 2009 when the program was being planned, staff knew it would be monumentally time consuming to encode thousands of <dao> or hyperlinks into finding aids by hand, nor did it fit with the goal to begin a low-cost, programmatic approach to large-scale digitization that was not dependent on significant funding for staff. So the XSLT script that transforms finding aids was modified to add unique IDs to the HTML output for every EAD <container> (regardless of whether there might be digital content), and developers in library Systems created a lightweight application programming interface to CONTENTdm and authored a javascript that uses AJAX calls to the CONTENTdm API to dynamically create links to the digitized content in the HTML finding aid container lists. No extra EAD encoding or modification of finding aids is required in order for links to newly digitized content to appear. This client-side, real-time approach ensures that as new content from any collection is digitized and loaded into CONTENTdm, it becomes immediately available to users through the finding aid, without any further intervention from staff.

Here's an example of a finding aid linked to digital content:
http://www.lib.unc.edu/mss/inv/t/Trist,Nicholas_Philip.html

In 2011 the Triangle Research Libraries Network (composed of the libraries of Duke, North Carolina Central University, UNC-Chapel Hill and North Carolina State University) received funding from the State Library of North Carolina for the grant "Content, Context, and Capacity: a Collaborative Large-Scale Digitization Project on the Long Civil Rights Movement in North Carolina" (www.trln.org/ccc<http://www.trln.org/ccc>). As part of this grant, the four libraries will work together to digitize 40 archival collections and to link the digital content for all of them directly from their finding aids. Additionally, digital content from all four university libraries will be linked from finding aids in the shared Search TRLN catalog (http://search.trln.org/).

Joyce





On Thu, Feb 16, 2012 at 11:00 AM, Custer, Mark <[log in to unmask]<mailto:[log in to unmask]>> wrote:
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> Hi all,
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> I really like how the Special Collections Research Center at the University of Chicago provides access to digitized content via their online finding aids.  It's simple, it preserves context, and - perhaps most importantly - it's available for off-line research.  For examples of how they provide access, see the "inventory" section within any of the finding aids on the following webpage:
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> http://www.lib.uchicago.edu/e/scrc/findingaids/browse.php?browse=digital
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> I also really, really, really like the University of North Texas Digital Library, http://digital.library.unt.edu/, which provides exemplary item-level webpages that push everything out (from metadata, use stats, and even the ability to download images, albeit one at a time, in this case) in a clean and clear user interface.
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> So, my questions are:
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> 1.       Can anyone point me to other examples, like the University of Chicago, which provide easy access, whether via bulk downloads or a single packaged file, to digitized (or born-digital) objects that have been arranged by an archives?
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> For example, I just found another great example provided by the Portal de Archivos Espao˝les (http://pares.mcu.es/) by way of the awesome APEnet portal (http://www.archivesportaleurope.eu/).  So, I know that there must be many more examples out there!
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> 2.       How about any other examples like the UNT Digital Library, especially if those are tied to EAD finding aids?
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> 3.       What about an ideal combination of the above?
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> Any and all examples are welcome,
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> Mark
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--
Joyce Chapman
Triangle Research Libraries Network
CB# 3926, Wilson Special Collections Library
Chapel Hill, NC 27514-8890
Phone: (919) 962-1345<tel:%28919%29%20962-1345>
Email: [log in to unmask]<mailto:[log in to unmask]>
Website: www.trln.org/ccc<http://www.trln.org/ccc>