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On 11/04/2012, Tom Fine wrote:

> To prove Karl's point, and I am sure this experience is not unique, I
> encountered a stereo LP this morning that had the exact kind of vinyl
> "pimple" described previously. The pops and ticks transferred just
> fine at 88.2/24-bit PCM, despite being very sharp rise times and
> dropoffs. They are definitely not square waves, but they rise quickly
> between samples. The waveform editor did not show any "ringing" at the
> top of the rise, and the dropoff was uniform also, so I conclude that
> PCM sampling captures these as they are produced by the analog
> equipment. It is also clear that the needle is not leaving the groove
> because the pops "ride" on top of the music waveform and thus can
> easily be edited out with the pencil tool. When they occur during
> pauses in the music, they are clearly "riding" on top of the surface
> noise and rumble. This can easily be seen by zooming in far enough in
> the waveform editor. It was reasonable ambient humidity and the vinyl
> was not carrying a bad static charge, so I didn't encounter any of the
> saturation-pops to analize, but I have done that previously and stand
> by my previous description, adding that those, too, are not square
> waves.
> 
> Karl is correct that no equipment, digital or analog, can reproduce
> all square waves and impulses, but good ones can handle that
> information within the bandwidth of human hearing. 

Or, ideally, within the bandwidth of a cartridge.

> And, in defense of
> the CD format, if 44.1/16 were so limited in the ability to capture,
> process and reproduce square waves and impulses, then almost all
> synthesizers would sound like total crap on CD, and "electronica" as a
> music genre would have never risen up in the CD era. The same can be
> said for highyl-synthesized genres like hip-hop, 80's pop-rock and
> post-disco dance music, not to mention movie soundtracks. Yes, there
> is more "there" there with higher-resolution PCM digital, but there's
> a lot of "there" with the Red Book resolution and it can jump out at
> you better without tape hiss or LP surface noise and rumble competing
> with it. Given that, by the time CDs took hold as a mass medium, the
> most popular mass medium for music distribution was fast-duped
> cassettes, the Compact Disc was a great leap forward (cassettes
> outsold LPs soon after the Walkman Revolution took hold; CDs didn't
> outsell cassettes until the early 1990s -- see numerous references and
> industry data available online).
> 
Regards
-- 
Don Cox
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