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I wanted to share this article without starting a long discussion (though  
I'm sure a discussion will begin <g>). It's an article in today's Wall  
Street Journal about CD ripping services. The concept is that CDs take up space, 
 while digital files don't. And many of these services will digitize 3,000 
or  more albums. Of course you save space but IMHO: 
1) MOST of us don't have time in our life left to listen to literally  
hundred (let alonr 10,00s) of albums - and we are constantly buying them,  right?
2) It's easier to go to a shelf and find an album and look at track list  
then search on a little screen.
 
Then again, the younger ( mean younger than MOST of those here though there 
 are folks in their 20s and early 30s) listeners don't covet the "album" 
concept  nor physical Lps or CD. All music is disposable and - if there's a 
song you  haven't heard in years, you can find it for 99 cents at any time.
 
I rip SOME of my CDs to put on my 2GB MP3 players (I have 2) to take on  
walks or trips. (I used to walk with a CD player attached to my belt but the 
MP3  player is lighter.) I am constantly removing albums from the player and  
replacing with new arrivals. But for true at home listening I have a CD 
player  attached to my large and reliable Scott S-15 speakers. And, yes, I have 
way too  many CDs (but I'm getting better in donating ones I haven't 
listened to or when  my tastes change.) But that's the nature of our hobby.
 
I have a friend in his late 60s that just sent 1,000 (!) Cds to a company  
who returned them on a hard drive (along with the CDs). I kidded the guy  
wondering WHEN he would listen to them all! 
 
So here is the link to the article. I think all you ARSCers will get a  
chuckle when you get to the last paragraph. (but don't skip ahead - no  fair):
 
_http://tinyurl.com/83rju25_ (http://tinyurl.com/83rju25) 


Steve Ramm