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Don't forget that this method (in my limited experience) makes the tapes 
workable for a few seconds only and then they become unplayable. Our 
friends at the Phonogram Archiv in Vienna claim to have a method that is 
better. It's a secret for now until they get a patent on it, but if you 
send them the tape they claim to be able to bring it back to life and 
they also digitize it for you. I have no affiliation and have not used 
their method so usual disclaimers apply.
Shai

בתאריך 29/06/12 9:21 PM, ציטוט Matthew Sohn:
> Try hydrating the tape and unwinding it slowly (by hand) to find any sticky
> spots. If you don't hydrate enough, or unwind too fast, you risk delamination.
>
> To rehydrate, put the tape in an enclosed chamber containing water on the
> bottom, and a raised surface (above the water) to place the tape. Leave the tape
> there for a while. If it still seems brittle, leave it for another while. Once
> it becomes supple to the touch, it is ready to work with.
>
> -Matt Sohn
>
>
>
>
> ----- Original Message ----
> From: Alex Kroh<[log in to unmask]>
> To: [log in to unmask]
> Sent: Fri, June 29, 2012 1:41:16 PM
> Subject: [ARSCLIST] Pinning Acetate Tape
>
> Hi Folks,
>
> I have an acetate audiotape that is pinning (a term used in the Sound
> Directions project). Basically, bits of oxide are sticking to adjacent
> layers of tape and are thus removed from the substrate upon unwinding. Does
> anyone know of a way to remedy this situation?
>
> Thanks,
> Alex Kroh
>
>

-- 
בברכה,
שי דרורי
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