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Radio Recorders would also do sessions for syndicated shows and
audition programs.  I've got a couple of those in my collection.

I've also got some Crosby shows from the early 50s for GE on 16"
lacquers with Radio Recorders labels - they sound like airchecks from
a SF station.

On Fri, Jun 22, 2012 at 11:02 AM, Michael Biel <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> From: Bob Olhsson
>> Capitol originally recorded at Radio Recorders and I believe the Bing Crosby
>> shows were also taped there. When Capitol bought their own studio it was
>> staffed mostly with people from Radio.
>> (Pre-recording radio shows was their original business, hence the name.)
>> Bob Olhsson
>
> Not really.  Their major work was recording line checks of live
> broadcasts (mostly for CBS) for more than a decade before the networks
> allowed the playing of recordings on the networks.
>
> Crosby's show was on ABC and the recordings were done with their
> facilities on disc for a year before Jack Mullen moved his magnetophones
> into their studios.  Many of the programs were recorded in San Francisco
> and other locations.
>
> Mike Biel  [log in to unmask]
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From Tom Fine:
> ...Capitol and Mercury started doing most recording onto tape in the
> 1948
> timeframe. Capitol was one of the first customers for the Ampex 200 and
> later 300 model tape machines, at their studio in California (I don't
> think
> they had their own studio in NYC in those days). Mercury used three
> early
> adopters of tape recorders for much of their recording in the late 40's
> --
> Radio Recorders in Hollywood, Universal Recording (Bill Putnam) in
> Chicago
> and Reeves Studios in NYC. Reeves was fully equipped to do both tape and
> disk recording in 1948, as detailed in a series of articles in one of
> the
> magazines of the day, reprinted by Fairchild (the main supplier of
> recording
> equipment to Reeves at that time)...
>
>
> -------- Original Message --------
> Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] Magnetic Tape/Recorders
> From: Carl Pultz <[log in to unmask]>
> Date: Fri, June 22, 2012 9:54 am
> To: [log in to unmask]
>
> Foggy recollection: Capitol bought the Melrose Ave. studios, which had
> been
> a radio network facility - right? I read that the big room had fine
> acoustics, which they had a hard time replicating in the new tower
> studio.
> This comes from a book on Sinatra, so not from a technical POV.
>