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I made the Richard Thompson comment initially and indeed was out there secretly recording his  concerts and trading tapes in the early 80's. Partly, it was because of the sheer scarcity of finding any of his official output at that time. When he did finally tour in the US after a pause of more than a decade  it seemed a moment well worth documenting and it was as it was his final tour with his then partner Linda Thompson.

Once I started working in sound professionally I stopped recording shows, but I think the artists awareness of a fanbase hungry for more has led artists like Thompson, They Might Be Giants, Metallica etc to regularly release high quality copies of their live concerts In the post record label era this has become a crucial source of income for them.




On Jun 1, 2012, at 12:35 PM, Ken Haverly wrote:

> To obliquely tie two recent threads together, someone mentioned Richard Thompson
> as an older performer who can still reliably and non-embarrassingly rock out when the
> time is right. All true, but in the context of the ARSClist digest I was reading I 
> remembered an interview I read with Richard once, where the subject of unauthorized
> concert recordings came up. (This was a while back, probably before RT started 
> releasing a large number of professionally done concert recordings to fans through
> his website).  He'd said he'd never made any efforts to stop fan trading of concert tapes
> and professed himself confused/bemused at the notion that anyone would want to listen
> to or collect warts and all mid-fi front of the house recordings of his concerts. But he also
> said that in a way he could sympathize, because if given the opportunity he would like 
> to hear every note Bix Beiderbecke ever played. The fan's and musician's perspectives
> in one!
> 
> Anyway, if anyone is interested in bootlegging in the rock era, let me recommend Clinton
> Heylin's book Bootleg, first issued in the late 1990s and updated in the early 2000s to 
> include the early days of MP3 trading. One of the principal bootleggers of the day wrote
> a long series of posts on the Record Collector's Guild website a few years ago which 
> make fascinating reading, as well - they're still available and the thread starts here:
> 
> <http://www.recordcollectorsguild.org/index.php?name=PNphpBB2&file=viewtopic&t=23532>