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I have to wonder if the market for classical cds, particularly used
cds, has gone downhill a bit because of layoffs and cutbacks in higher
ed the past few years.  I have one friend, a musician, that's typical
- he was laid off and pretty much had to sell a big swath of his
classical cd collection to get by.  At first, he could sell them at
used cd/record stores; now they're glutted and don't take them unless
they're unusual.

A significant component of the market for classical works is
associated with higher ed and arts organizations.

On Sat, Aug 11, 2012 at 7:41 PM, Karl Miller <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> As far as I know the only comprehensive price guide for Classical recordings was
> the one prepared and published by David Canfield. It dates from 2000 and, based
> upon my own experience, things have changed since then. Since I retired, my wife
> and I sell recordings (CDs and LPs) which are donated to our record company and
> use the profit to fund releases. The Canfield Guide lists Lyrita records at
> prices ranging from about $8-49. We just advertised a group of about 25 Lyrita
> discs (near mint condition) and sold but a few of them at around $7. each. More
> than half--no bids.  I have found that some of the higher priced items still
> command a "higher" price, but in general, I have watched price fall
> significantly.
>