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Thanks for all the responses (so far). I live in a pretty 
record-conscious area, so I've long known about the general market 
conditions for both classical LP and CDs.

The standard repertory on mainstream record labels on LP is 
practically a dead market - hundreds of albums in $1.00 bins that sit 
around for years - except for the occasional interesting 
configuration (WLP; still sealed; interesting promo press material 
included; etc.).

For CDs, the market is rapidly declining, as it is for DVDs. 
Downloaded classical music is rapidly rising, as is bit-rate quality. 
Still, folks like DGG and Naive and Naxos release incredible amounts 
of new CDs each year... Since most new classical CDs I see are 
"international" - pressed usually in Europe - I can only assume the 
retail market is more widespread than DVD (damn regional coding!). 
That may sustain the market a bit longer.

Ironically, new LP pressing has surged into a healthy niche market, 
and will probably stay that way, serving both audiophiles and 
hipsters.

Although the vast majority of classical LP have low collector value 
(as do pop records), there are enough desirable rarities to still 
make an authoritative price guide useful. Bluebacks, shaded dogs, old 
stereo UK pressings, private releases, early mono quartets, avant 
garde and uncommon modern composers - these sorts of niches still 
reach good prices on the collector market. Far as I see.

Stephen


-- 
Stephen M.H. Braitman

COMPLETE MUSIC APPRAISAL, ARCHIVAL, AND DISBURSEMENT SERVICES

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