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All well and good!
It's been pretty much shown here that the function has been around 
almost since the industry began, but when did the term "A&R man" come 
into common usage?
I thought that was the original question.
Mal

On 8/14/2012 7:28 PM, Dan Nelson wrote:
> Rosario Bourdon  in addition to  being an "operative" for Victor  conducted  salon orchestras  for transcription companies. Here is one of those multi talented men in the music business.
> d nelson ward
>   
> Beautiful Music you will never forget, at; http://www.americanbeautiful.podbean.com/
>
>
>
>
> ________________________________
>   From: Dennis Rooney <[log in to unmask]>
> To: [log in to unmask]
> Sent: Monday, August 13, 2012 8:55 PM
> Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] Does anybody know when the various recording companies realized that they needed an Artist and Repertoire administrator?
>   
> A&R wasn't always called such, but the job was around since the dawn of the
> commercial phonograph industry. Usually, someone with musical training was
> spotted and developed. Fred Gaisberg began as a teenager in Washington,
> D.C. before he moved to London. Columbia had Charles Adams Prince when
> Walter B. Rogers performed the same function at Victor. "Recording
> Directors", they were called. They often had relationships with orchestras
> and bands, which made them useful for engaging personnel. Later Victor
> operatives included Calvin Child, Joseph Pasternack, Rosario Bourdon and
> Charles O'Connell. Someone must have already treated the subject so there
> will be more information soon to appear.
>
> DDR
>
> On Mon, Aug 13, 2012 at 2:40 PM, Eric <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>
>> Does anybody know when the various recording companies realized that they
>> needed an Artist and Repertoire administrator?  Is it possible to obtain
>> from some archives the requirements for the position?  Any help would be
>> greatly appreciated.
>>
>
>