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I agree.  I think this turntable would counter the ground vibration
effects seen in cheaper turntables, especially from freight trains
passing twenty miles away or minor earthquakes on the other side of
the continent.

For a $20K upgrade, you can get a special upgrade that allows you to
vacuum seal the turntable and your record in a large bell jar to
prevent stray air currents from impacting stylus pressure and
tracking.


On Wed, Sep 19, 2012 at 4:33 PM, Clark Johnsen <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> Footfall susceptibility is the obvious vibration problem with many
> turntables. Left mostly unsaid is the pernicious effect of low-level,
> omnipresent vibration transmitted up from the earth. Most built-in
>  isolation methods and suspensions fail to stop this and those that
> somewhat do, then fail to account for the far more worrisome lateral
> shaking... the stuff that fells buildings in earthquake zones.
>
> It is my considered view that much of the difference heard among turntables
> (apart from the clearcut stuff like rumble) can be accounted for by their
> susceptibility to this unsuspected vibration environment. One class of
> exception: The very, very expensive 'tables that do seem to address this
> situation, but I can't say for certain. One thing I do know, though, is
> that clamping a 'table down tightly to the earth only allows more
> ground vibrations to proceed into the unit.
>
> clark
>