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There was a paper published in the last few years in the IASA journal
about DAT ripping in DDS drives.  Fascinating read.  I wasn't totally
convinced it's "we have to implement this now!" worthy, but I was
going to run some tests before implementing it here on a collection of
hundreds of DATs.  However, this never happened due to
inconsequentially boring internal reasons.

Jim Sam
Hoover Archives, Stanford



On Tue, Sep 11, 2012 at 2:33 PM, Matthew Sohn <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>>That whole DAT-extraction thing seems very kludgey. Also, reports seem to
>>indicate that few people get it working reliably and use it for large
>>collections. I'm sure there are some >experts on-list who do this all the time,
>>but that doesn't seem common. For a small or medium-sized collection (fewer than
>>a few hundred DATs), I think it's much easier to just use >SPDIF and go
>>real-time with somewhat common regular DAT machines. If you monitor in real
>>time, you can clearly hear if there are the problems that plague some DATs,
>>>uncorrectable errors, mutes, dropouts, etc.
>>
>>-- Tom Fine
>
> Yes it is kludgey to get the unit to work, but once it is configured, it can
> work like a charm. Any errors are easily viewable in a competent DAW such as
> Wavelab. In such cases, I try a pass on the Sony R500. 9 times out of 10 it
> works fine.
>
> I must admit that this is a repurposing of already outmoded technology. It is
> difficult to find the drives, and you have to seek out the software, plus
> figuring out how to make it work.
> But if your collection is very large, it may be worth looking into.
> Of course, all this assumes a competent engineer, who can recognize errors when
> they see them..
>
> -Matt Sohn