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Any "good" scanner should automatically color-adjust the scanned image to
correct for the spectral characteristics of the light source.

Jerry Hartke

> -----Original Message-----
> From: Association for Recorded Sound Discussion List
> [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Richard L. Hess
> Sent: Wednesday, September 19, 2012 8:54 AM
> To: [log in to unmask]
> Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] 35mm slide scanner -- what's good these days?
> 
> Hi, Don,
> 
> Your points are well-taken, but I have been using north daylight (that
> illuminates the basement windows near the scanner) as well as 5K
> fluorescent (Chroma 50 in a light table), and fluorescent monitor
> backlighting (as a quick check at night) and find no significant issues
> with any film not being reasonably captured by either the Epson V700 or
> the Nikon LS5000ES. These are both high end (short of drum or the
> Hasselblad system). In the limited testing I did with the Nikon D200 and
> the Nikon 60 mm f/2.8 AF micro-Nikkor, I used a Omega "Chromega" 2-1/4 x
> 2-1/4 enlarger lamp head (with no colour correction dialed in) as the
> light source (which is a halogen MR-16 style lamp). While the results
> were good, the feed issues, the lack of Digital Ice, and the lack of an
> auto feeder did not favour this approach. I also recall an issue with
> cropping and centring/straightening the slide.
> 
> A good portion of the throughput on the Nikon occurred when I filled it
> up with 60+ slides just before bed and if I got up in the middle of the
> night re-filled it with another 60+ slides. So that's 800 "free"
> additional scans a week.
> 
> For all that has been said about this, I offer
> http://www.pbase.com/rlhess/demos I've added item 6 this morning.
> 
> What is there is:
> (1) A preliminary reconstruction of a self-portrait from the late 1930s
> or early 1940s of my mentor, Milton F Gentsch, from the contact prints
> he made at the time of the three-glass-negative 8x10 set that were
> separated in the tricolor camera at the moment of exposure. I have the
> glass negative sets for perhaps fifteen or so of his carbro prints.
> Sadly, the prints are nowhere to be found--I do not know what happened
> to his sister's estate when she died and even my 35 mm Kodachromes of
> the carbro prints have not turned up during the scanning. I don't know
> where they are hiding. I only have my memory of the carbros to adjust
> colour to. This sample is not true to the carbro (tri-color carbon)
> print and I have not had time to work on it. The three prints were
> scanned on an Epson 1660 flatbed (now gone). These 8x10 negatives were
> one of the reasons I bought the V700 as it can handle 8x10 transparencies.
> 
> (2) A V700 scan (on the glass) of a 127 Brownie negative. Made with
> either a Brownie Bullet or Brownie Holiday Flash camera on Kodacolor
> film in 1961. Scanned from the negative using the native Epson scanning
> software. I still have the quality Abercrombie and Fitch nylon flag and
> all the colours are true to recollection with the exception that the
> scanning software might have opted for today's taste (helped along by
> Fuji Velvia) for slightly more saturated than real life colours. Since
> it was a negative, there was no real way of judging or calibrating the
> image, although there was an effort with IT8 charts and a "spider" to
> calibrate my full setup half way through the project and things were
> close as we did not do colour adjustment manually at any point prior to
> saving the "raw" scan files outside of the Digital DEE (@8) on the Nikon.
> 
> (3 & 4) Two Nikon LS5000ES scans from Fuji Velvia. Notre Dame Cathedral
> in Paris and the Roman Aqueduct at Caesaria in Israel at sunset using
> our standard settings for Velvia. By the way, Velvia was the only film
> that gave the autofocus on the Coolscan a headache. It found focus
> reliably on all other films, but missed a couple percent of Velvia
> images. There was a significant amount of Kodachrome 25 in the overall
> scanning project and there were no significant focus misses that I
> caught and yes the slides are being retained.
> 
> (5) Is a series of V700 scans on the glass of a 5x7 original
> transparency shot in a Linhof technical camera I inherited from Milton
> and have subsequently sold when it was clear that I would not use it. I
> bought the Schneider Super Angulon 90 mm lens for this project (I needed
> the excuse--also sold years ago). The original TIFs are only 130 MB (43
> MP) each because I knew we actually had issues with film flatness in the
> Linhof--a problem I never really solved and perhaps one of the reasons
> why 4x5 seemed so much more prevalent than 5x7 in the overall
> photography world. A friend either just sold or is about to sell his 6x9
> cm Arca rail camera system. The colours are pretty true to the original
> Ektachrome transparencies--which I was never that thrilled with.
> Lighting was tungsten.
> 
> (6) Is another sub-folder that contains a V700 scan originally made at
> 175 MP 16 bit of a Linhof original made with the Zeiss Double Protar (or
> was it the Schneider Super Angulon--I seem to remember the Protar) that
> I inherited with the camera. There is a small detail as a 16-bit TIF
> from slightly to the right of centre above the lower barn roof. There is
> also a Kodachrome 25 scan of the same basic scene after the cows went
> in. That is a JPG of the raw 12 MP standard scan--the mount was included
> to make certain we did not cut off any images as there is some tolerance
> in slide positioning even in the Nikon and also slightly varying sizes
> of mounts (not counting "super slides" which do not scan in the Nikon).
> This was made on the 1981-01 trip to Toronto from NYC after I had
> accepted the job at McCurdy Radio to go find a house. The lady who owned
> the farm was friends of the family and I had not stopped in to see her
> for years. I took the Linhof out in Glendale once more and realized that
> it was not for me standing under the black cloth fighting with focus
> while my wife stood by and that 35 mm fit more with my style of shooting
> (VR and great quality at higher ISOs has almost completely gotten me
> away from using a tripod--heck, the normal ISO for the digicam is 200
> while my best quality images were shot at ISO 25-50 in 35 mm).
> 
> Cheers,
> 
> Richard
> 
> 
> 
> 
> On 2012-09-19 7:42 AM, Don Cox wrote:
> > My concern about either LED or fluorescent lighting is that the spectrum
> > is peaky, not smooth, and could interact with the film dyes and the
> > colour filters in the digital sensor to give unpredictable colour bias.
> >
> > I would prefer either daylight or tungsten halogen with a blue
> > correcting filter.
> 
> --
> Richard L. Hess                   email: [log in to unmask]
> Aurora, Ontario, Canada           (905) 713 6733     1-877-TAPE-FIX
> http://www.richardhess.com/tape/contact.htm
> Quality tape transfers -- even from hard-to-play tapes.