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Where can I find audio of that program? Any BBC people on-list here?

----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Ted Kendall" <[log in to unmask]>
To: <[log in to unmask]>
Sent: Wednesday, September 26, 2012 12:28 PM
Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] early stereophony


> On 26/09/2012 16:51, Tom Fine wrote:
>> Are you guys saying that the Philips-Miller system that etched 
>> optically-read soundtracks onto coated film stock was used to make 
>> stereophonic recordings? History, please! Was it two machines locked 
>> together or did they use two inscribing heads for the same piece of film?
>>
>> -- Tom Fine
>>
>> ----- Original Message ----- From: "Ted Kendall" 
>> <[log in to unmask]>
>> To: <[log in to unmask]>
>> Sent: Wednesday, September 26, 2012 11:41 AM
>> Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] early stereophony
>>
>>
>>> On 26/09/2012 16:06, Gray, Mike wrote:
>>>> Further on Columbia stereo ...
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> The IS Agon was recorded at Goldwyn Stage 7 in Hollywood, June 17, 
>>>> 1957.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> >From 1957 - 1959, Columbia often had both two- and three-track 
>>>> running at orchestral sessions.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> If we really want to be complete ref. stereo, we ought to credit the 
>>>> Dutch / Philips-Miller experiments recorded onto film in 1939 - 
>>>> 1940. To my knowledge, these recordings have never been published.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> On RRG - From the summary of Heinz H.K. Thiele's presentation on RRG 
>>>> stereo at AES in Berlin in 1993:
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> 'Approximately 200 recordings, mainly of classical music, were made 
>>>> at the RRG. Only five of these recordings remain in existence today 
>>>> -- the others could not be found after World War II.'
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> The missing reels undoubtedly went to Moscow where they were 
>>>> degaussed and reused by the Russians on captured Magnetophone machines.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> Mike Gray
>>>>
>>> A brief clip of some stereo street sounds from a 194something stereo 
>>> Philips- Miller was included in "The Hearing Aid" - a BBC programme 
>>> on the history of stereophony, made in 1964. Philips may still have 
>>> them?
>>>
>>
> Two heads, one film, from what I can gather - the BBC mono machines were 
> adjusted cut a second track onto used film during wartime shortages, so 
> the medium had space enough for two tracks. I think the narration of the 
> programme confirms this.
>