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I, too, spend days and days with Tall's splicing blick and s single-edged
razor growing out of the end of my right hand.  I did the Callas Mexico City
lacquers, ticky and grungy, and countless 78 sides.  

Dave Hancock had perfect pitch.  He cut for me as Perennial Records and for
other small-timers whose work I did.  His advice was invaluable.  He was
also a fine (small f) mastering engineer.  I used him for most work.  Look
for the DBH in a box in the dead wax to identify his work.

I used Jim Shelton at Europadisc when I had extended frequency tapes that
required close shepharding since I could kibbitz while he cut.  I did the
Reiner Philharmonic premium set there, among others.  I used Bob Ludwig for
the trickiest stuff- the Mitropoulos Mahler 5, the first of the NY Phil's
premium sets, was wonderfully done by him. I think he also cut the Bernstein
Debut.  I can't recall any longer which of the Chicago SO premiums I did
where. The latter all came from tapes but the Philharmonic stuff needed much
declicking.  The Stokowski set was frought with problems.  Some declicking I
did by hand, some using the Packburn, following Richard Burn's hook-up
instructions and operating guidelines, a small matter some others ignored.

It was more than a cut-and-splice operation.  One had to listen for audio
hiccoughs that resulted from misphasing and redo splices with minute
increments of distance changes between the two sides.  White tape showing
through on the other side is not careless splicing but carefully positioned
spaces to eliminate or reduce this effect.  Pianos were tough, bassons and
oboes even more so, and French horns impossible. 

The Garrard, Burwin, Shure and other patch-type declicking machines never
worked to my satisfaction and in all my years of doing this kind of work, I
never employed one.  

Steve Smolian


-----Original Message-----
From: Association for Recorded Sound Discussion List
[mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of James Roth
Sent: Monday, October 01, 2012 1:13 PM
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] Reducing crackle from 78 rpm records the analogue
way on 70's reissue LP's

Hello all.

In the 70's I work at "Club 99" [operatic reissue) records.
I would use a razor blade and a splicing block to "de-click" the tape
transfers of some very scratchy 78s.
It would take about 3 hours to de-click a 4-minute aria - verrrrry tedious.
Then, we would take the tape to our sound engineer in Manhattan, David
Hancock (RIP) and he would so some expert EQ.
  
Regards,
Ben Roth


-----Original Message-----
From: Association for Recorded Sound Discussion List
[mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Jan Myren
Sent: Monday, October 01, 2012 12:22 PM
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: [ARSCLIST] Reducing crackle from 78 rpm records the analogue way on
70's reissue LP's

 

 

HI!

 

I spent the week-end going through my collection of 70's and 80's
compilation albums of old jazz records remastered by John R.T. Davies and
Robert Parker.

 

I must say I am a bit impressed by the way they were able to suppress noise
and especially the crackle form the old 78's they used.

 

May anybody remember (or know) how they did that and what kind of machines
they used back in the analogue days?

 

All the best

Jan