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Thanks Don,  they were certainly a stellar team!

db

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On 2012-11-06, at 10:28 AM, Donald Tait <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

>  Reiner/CSO Pines of Rome -- Orchestra Hall, October 24, 1959.
> 
>  This was a morning session. Respighi's Fountains of Rome was recorded that evening.
> 
>  Producer: Richard Mohr. Engineer: Lewis Layton.
> 
>  Don Tait
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> -----Original Message-----
> From: DAVID BURNHAM <[log in to unmask]>
> To: ARSCLIST <[log in to unmask]>
> Sent: Tue, Nov 6, 2012 2:46 am
> Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] Medinah Temple
> 
> 
> A recording which may have been made in the Medinah Temple, I don't know, (I 
> could check the CD but I'm in Florida at the moment and the CD isn't), Reiner's 
> CSO recording of the "Pines of Rome" as released on SACD is, I believe, arguably 
> one of the best orchestral recordings ever made - as regards the dynamic range, 
> the frequency range and the superb stereo imaging.  I don't know what recording 
> techniques were involved but this recording presents a solid wall of sound 
> between the speakers with accurate imaging right across.  One characteristic I 
> look for in orchestral recordings and strive for on my own recordings, (which 
> was often lacking on "Decca-tree" recordings or Mercury's and other's 3 mike 
> set-up), is near centre imaging.  I want to clearly hear that the flutes and 
> clarinets are slightly to the left of centre and the oboes and bassoons are 
> slightly to the right.  This recording exhibits that imaging.  If you listen, 
> for example, to another
> of my favourite orchestral recordings, Mercury's recording of Enesco's 
> "Roumanian Rhapsody No. 1", also on SACD, you'll hear the clarinet and the oboe, 
> playing a dialog with each other in the opening, occupying exactly the same 
> position in the centre of the sound-stage.  I'm not a fanatic to the point that 
> my enjoyment of a recording is destroyed if this characteristic is lacking, but 
> I enjoy it more if it's there.
> 
> db
> 
> 
> 
> 
>> ________________________________
>> From: Roderic G Stephens <[log in to unmask]>
>> To: [log in to unmask] 
>> Sent: Tuesday, November 6, 2012 2:53:55 AM
>> Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] Medinah Temple
>> 
>> Yes, the Capitol classical series on reel to reel two track stereo tapes that 
> had the ZF prefix were the beginning of hi-fi sound for those of us who were 
> looking for most outstanding new magnetic recordings.  We shouldn't fail to 
> mention the Hollywood Bowl Symphony Orchestra (really the L.A. Philharmonic) 
> conducted by Carmen Dragon or the hi-fi spectacular, Felix Slatkin - Young 
> Person's Guide to the Orchestra  -  Britten - Variations on a Nursery Tune - 
> Dohnanyi - ZF-23.  Both on tape or disk, it's still an amazing recording that 
> has been remastered and reissued at least once, last by Cisco.
>> 
>> --- On Mon, 11/5/12, Paul Stamler <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>> 
>> From: Paul Stamler <[log in to unmask]>
>> Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] Medinah Temple
>> To: [log in to unmask]
>> Date: Monday, November 5, 2012, 10:07 PM
>> 
>> On 11/5/2012 3:32 PM, Tom Fine wrote:
>> 
>>> People sometimes don't associate Capitol and its engineering staff with
>>> classical recording, but they always had at least one foot in the
>>> business in the LP era. Steinberg/Pittsburgh and Stokowski/Houston
>>> recorded on the Capitol label. Capitol also did "sound spectacular"
>>> light-classical records in Hollywood with Erich Leinsdorf and Leonard
>>> Slatkin.
>> 
>> I have a few of those; in that era it would have been Felix Slatkin, Leonard's 
> dad; Leonard was just a pup then. As was I.
>> 
>> Peace,
>> Paul
>> 
>> 
>> 
> 
>