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MARC is still in use and will be until it gets replaced, which it definitely
will. People still need to be trained on it. Unless something replaces what
we have overnight-- standards, input screens, and all, there will be a
transition. 

Kevin wrote:
Certainly the people with higher responsibility (supervisors, project
managers, etc.) in cataloging will need to know the format languages for the
underlying data.  But not *everyone*!

I think everyone who puts anything in the catalog should have to know how it
works according to the task they are assigned. If everyone also implies
publishers with ONIX data, and search engine programmers, they should also
have a better understanding of what we currently do.

Cindy



-----Original Message-----
From: Bibliographic Framework Transition Initiative Forum
[mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Amy Turner
Sent: Wednesday, January 16, 2013 12:34 PM
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: Re: [BIBFRAME] Input screens

I agree with Kevin, and think that some of the changes in RDA (more
what-you-see-is-what-you-get, fewer omissions, abbreviations and
interpretation of data on the piece) will make it easier for staff with less
training to do basic descriptive work, saving time for catalogers to work on
authority control, subject analysis and classification.


________________________________________
From: Bibliographic Framework Transition Initiative Forum
[[log in to unmask]] on behalf of Kevin M Randall
[[log in to unmask]]
Sent: Wednesday, January 16, 2013 12:22 PM
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: Re: [BIBFRAME] Input screens

Cindy Wolff wrote:

> There is discussion on fitting RDA into the MARC 21 record structure.
> Regardless of whether or not we keep anything that resembles MARC, why 
> are catalogers ridiculed for their own language and jargon when every 
> other profession has their own jargon?

I haven't seen anything yet that I'd consider to be ridicule of cataloger
language and jargon.  For myself, what I'm criticizing is the requirement to
have everyone doing cataloging work to learn the MARC format.  Just think
how much easier it would be to distribute cataloging work if there were
forms that were simple to use, with terminology in people's common language.
You could have temporary staff do things without taking up all their time
just learning MARC.  You could more readily take advantage of people's
foreign language skills.  Certainly the people with higher responsibility
(supervisors, project managers, etc.) in cataloging will need to know the
format languages for the underlying data.  But not *everyone*!

Kevin M. Randall
Principal Serials Cataloger
Northwestern University Library
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(847) 491-2939

Proudly wearing the sensible shoes since 1978!=