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Please contact me off-list if you are working with data sets.
I will summarize responses for the list.  (ArmyLib, FedLib)
Apologies for cross-posting.

I listened to the National Academies Board of Research Data and
Information's symposium yesterday.  The discussion directly relates to the
22 February OSTP memo which requires exposing and metatagging datasets.

Here's a bit about the symposium and what I learned from it.

The co-chairs of the Board on Research Data and Information, Clifford Lynch
of the Coalition on Networked Information, and Francine Berman of the
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, led the symposium discussion.

Title: Finding the Needle in the Haystack: A Symposium of the Board on
Research Data and Information on Strategies for Discovering Research Data
Online".  

Description: "Despite the proliferation of models and solutions in various
disciplines and sectors, there is a recognized need for a pervasive
infrastructure,
standardization of approaches, and the usual questions of who does what,
where, and how? This symposium therefore seeks to highlight some of these
different approaches, providing examples that are both broadly
interdisciplinary as well as discipline-specific to finding the right data
at the right place in the right time." 
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My takeaways:

Scientists have often created large data sets as part of their work.  These
data sets are sometimes too large to print to accompany a peer-reviewed
journal article or technical report.  Electronic access is best for this
material.

After it is created, a data set must be stored, accessed, described, cited,
and managed.  The availability of a data set may add to the impact of the
work for the author and organization. Inability to access it might delay the
peer-review process or limit discovery and connections from current to new
research. For Data sets created in Defense agencies, who has the
responsibility for storing, tagging, providing access to, and citing them
(my agency/Army/DoD/DTIC?)?

Data sets are covered by the 22 Feb 2013 Memorandum from the Office of
Science and Technology Policy, Executive Office of the President,
"Increasing access to the results of federally funded scientific research."

NSF requires a data management plan/system for any data set used in
research funded by them. Do other agencies have similar requirements? 

There is no standard for creating a data set or citing it.  Thomson Reuters
(Web of Science) has created a Data Citation index to cite and link to data
sets mentioned in peer-reviewed literature. Thomson Reuters includes a
recommended citation format for the data sets they cover.  

Should our library begin to discover the data sets created by our
scientists or contractor researchers?  Should we help them create a data
management plan - if one does not already exist? For Defense agencies,
should DTIC create a place to store the data where it can be accessed by
authorized
users for DoD datasets?

Who decides what restrictions must be placed on data sets? The scientist?
The contract researcher? Public Affairs? Security? Or all of the above?

============================================================================
They will archive the audio and post at
http://www.nationalacademies.org/brdi   


Tracy
-----
Tracy Landfried, MLS
US Army Research Development and Engineering Command 
Army Research Laboratory 
RDRL-CIO-LA 
APG MD 21005-5067

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:Office: (410)306-0620  
:Fax:(410)306-0630
:DSN: 458-0620  



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