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On 16/04/2013, Tom Fine wrote:

> Is anyone using any of the USB-attached RAID backup systems? If so,
> can you share your recommendations and experienced. Connection would
> be to a PC that has two external USB2 drives as the main storage. I'd
> like to have some WindowsXP-compatible software that is crash-proof,
> doesn't hog resources and runs in the background, using idle times to
> keep things backed up to the attached RAID array. I've seen 2-HD and
> 4-HD enclosures, and I'm curious which kind other folks are using? I
> can't afford nor do I have the expertise to deal with one of the fancy
> NAS systems (plus, it would take forever to back up my studio drives
> over Ethernet, the backup needs to be via USB).
> 
I avoid RAID because if the control card fails, you lose everything on
the drives.

> Input much appreciated. Up to now, I've been manually backing up to a
> third, bigger USB drive. There's got to be a better way that won't
> take down Windows or be unreliable.
> 
I think if you have mainly large files, this is a good simple method for
now. I use Windows Commander (now Total Commander) for copying files 

I am waiting with interest the Millenniata Blu-Ray discs, but I expect
they will be expensive.

One approach for audio files would be to record them as analog on
reel-to-reel tape. But I don't think any medium that can be erased is
really archival.


> BTW, for what it's worth, I signed up for Carbonite for my office PC
> last year. So far, 9 months into it, it's only got the PC and external
> hard drive 30% backed up! So, not a practical solution if you have a
> lot of data to backup! I don't run the PC 24-7, but I do leave it on
> overnight most nights. To Carbonite's credit, the software prioritized
> My Documents and the key system-identification files and those got
> backed up first. But stuff like my iTunes library, my extensive
> audio-documentaton library, my HDTracks downloads, it'll take
> literally years. Not practical!
> 

Regards
-- 
Don Cox
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