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On 05/04/2013, Wolf, James L wrote:

> I've been appreciating this discussion a lot. Sounds like its about
> time for a solid historiography of jazz, meaning a critical evaluation
> of the different ways in which jazz history has been constructed.
> 
> One term for jazz that's always bugged me is "African-American
> Classical Music." To me, this speaks volumes not so much about racial
> identity but about class identity. By trying to claim to the golden
> ring of class status in music, certain jazz historians and musicians
> assume that European classical music actually occupies some throne of
> music and that jazz needs to "raise" itself by association. Both of
> these assumptions are absurd and unnecessary, IMO.
> 
Yes.

> Jazz's history is as complex as America's history, and that's how it
> should be. So I hope a lot of this reaction to Ken Burns gets taken up
> by academics and makes its way into the general populace.
> 
Any history of jazz should be based on the biographies of individuals,
and on who they knew and worked with and admired, and not on sorting people
into groups and categories.

Regards
-- 
Don Cox
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