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You're right about a stylus helping remove grease pencil in the groove 
BUT grease pencil is what I use to fill some digs before transferring a 
rare record to another medium. It works but only as a temporary measure. 
The stylus will cut a new channel through the very malleable pencil mark 
and play through (well enough to minimize any peaking when transferring 
to a digital medium - then you can use software to remove the rest 
without leaving nasty artifacts). This method works well for small digs 
but will not fill a tapering 2" long crack running from the edge in! 
That's a whole other topic for discussion.
Malcolm

*******

On 4/12/2013 5:47 AM, Hood, Mark wrote:
> Preserve the original condition with metadata - photos, description, etc.,
> then remove the grease pencil and digitize the disc's content.  I think
> most would agree that recovering the audio content before the media
> degrades into unplayability would outweigh preservation of the grease
> pencil record of the editor's opinion,  and with appropriate metadata,
> both can be preserved.
>
> In stubborn cases, I have found that a stylus actually helps break up the
> grease pencil (gentle attempt at playing the disc with a non-critical
> stylus), and then solvents can remove the remainder more easily.  This
> process did not appear to damage the lacquer or the stylus.
>
> Mark Hood
> IUB Media Preservation Task Force
> Assistant Professor of Music
> Department of Recording Arts
> Indiana University Jacobs School of Music
>
>
> On 4/12/13 11:18 AM, "Steve Greene" <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>
>> Playing devils advocate here...
>>
>> Those grease pencil marks are an edit decision.  I understand the
>> desirability of removing the contamination from the grooves from an audio
>> perspective, but from an archival perspective how do you do that and
>> preserve a record of the fact that the creator or editor thought the
>> grease penciled material was a bad take?
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> Steve Greene
>> Archivist
>> Office of Presidential Libraries
>> National Archives and Records Administration
>> (301) 837-1772
>>>>> "Peoples, Curtis" <[log in to unmask]> 4/12/2013 10:57 AM >>>
>> I was watching American Restoration and they talked about removing grease
>> pencil markings from various objects and said the oil from you skin was
>> the best. Rick Dale demonstrated by wiping his finger on his forehead and
>> erasing grease pencil marking from a piece of painted metal. It came off
>> without any smearing. Would there be a product comparable to "skin oil"?
>> Will it work on a disc? Soapy water will create a greasy mess. Solvents
>> will probably damage the disc.
>>
>>
>> Curtis L. Peoples, Ph.D.
>> Associate Archivist, Crossroads Music Archive,
>> www.crossroadsofmusic.ttu.edu
>> Unit Head, Crossroads Recording Studio,
>> http://library.ttu.edu/crossroadsrecordingstudio/
>> Director, TTU Americana Ensemble,
>> http://ttuamericanaensemble.weebly.com/index.html
>>
>> Contact Info:
>> Southwest Collection, Texas Tech University
>> P. O. Box 41041
>> Lubbock, Texas 79409-1041
>> Email: [log in to unmask]
>> TEL: 1+806-834-5777
>> FAX: 1+806-742-0496
>>
>>
>>
>> -----Original Message-----
>> From: Association for Recorded Sound Discussion List
>> [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Doug Pomeroy
>> Sent: Friday, April 12, 2013 9:31 AM
>> To: [log in to unmask]
>> Subject: [ARSCLIST] grease pencil removal
>>
>> I have never experimented with various cleaning fluids to remove grease
>> pencil from shellac and lacquer discs.  Any suggestions?
>>
>>
>> Doug Pomeroy
>> Audio Restoration and Mastering Services
>> 193 Baltic St (Clinton/Henry)
>> Brooklyn, NY  11201-6173
>> (718) 855-2650
>> [log in to unmask]