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I do the same thing, except I use the wax from a broken cylinder, melting a 
 drop with a pencil-type soldering iron.  I carefully place the drop into  
the area of the dig.  It can be 'flowed' by using the iron carefully, then  
scraped as noted below.  This technique can be used to fill edge flakes,  
flowing the wax to fill the void, scraping, then (with the record on a flat  
table) rubbing furiously so as to melt the wax and make it as flush with the  
record as possible.  With any luck, a playback with that VR II will carve a 
 new groove each rotation, until it reaches the first good groove,  Takes  
practice, but it works.  I demonstrated this procedure at a MAPS meeting in  
Michigan about 10 years ago. (Successfully, I might add.  8>) )
 
Don Chichester
 
 
In a message dated 4/12/2013 3:54:19 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time,  
[log in to unmask] writes:

I have a  block of paraffin canning wax for filling digs. a run through 
with 
my GE  VR II will recreate the grooves.

Another technique I have used  effectively is for records with either a 
scalloped edge chip or "bite" out  of a record. I put the record on a flat 
surface with waxed paper  underneath the damaged area. Holding a lighter 
underneath the paraffin  wax, I drip wax to fill  the hole, builting enough 
material to  completely fill the damage, and a little more just overlapping 
the groove  area around the damage. I then take a utility knife and remove 
from the  holder. I then scrape the wax down by pressing the blade against 
the good  area of the record until the wax is glassy smooth and level with 
the rest  of the record. A play or two with my VR II and I can then get a 
complete  transfer of the sound at 33 1/3 rpm. The drop out only lasts for 
a 
small  fraction of a second when I correct the speed, the repair is almost  
unnoticed when I've cleaned it up. -Mickey Clark
Follow me on  Twitter
https://twitter.com/MickeyRClark
M.C.Productions Vintage  Recordings
710 Westminster Ave. West
Penticton BC
250-462-7881
V2A 1K8
http://mcproductions.shawbiz.ca
----- Original Message -----  
From: "Malcolm Rockwell" <[log in to unmask]>
To:  <[log in to unmask]>
Sent: Friday, April 12, 2013 9:46  AM
Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] grease pencil removal


> You're  right about a stylus helping remove grease pencil in the groove 
BUT 
>  grease pencil is what I use to fill some digs before transferring a rare 
 
> record to another medium. It works but only as a temporary measure.  The 
> stylus will cut a new channel through the very malleable pencil  mark and 
> play through (well enough to minimize any peaking when  transferring to a 
> digital medium - then you can use software to  remove the rest without 
> leaving nasty artifacts). This method works  well for small digs but will 
> not fill a tapering 2" long crack  running from the edge in! That's a 
whole 
> other topic for  discussion.
> Malcolm
>
> *******
>
> On  4/12/2013 5:47 AM, Hood, Mark wrote:
>> Preserve the original  condition with metadata - photos, description, 
>> etc.,
>>  then remove the grease pencil and digitize the disc's content.  I  think
>> most would agree that recovering the audio content before  the media
>> degrades into unplayability would outweigh preservation  of the grease
>> pencil record of the editor's opinion,  and  with appropriate metadata,
>> both can be  preserved.
>>
>> In stubborn cases, I have found that a  stylus actually helps break up 
the
>> grease pencil (gentle attempt  at playing the disc with a non-critical
>> stylus), and then solvents  can remove the remainder more easily.  This
>> process did not  appear to damage the lacquer or the stylus.
>>
>> Mark  Hood
>> IUB Media Preservation Task Force
>> Assistant  Professor of Music
>> Department of Recording Arts
>>  Indiana University Jacobs School of Music
>>
>>
>>  On 4/12/13 11:18 AM, "Steve Greene" <[log in to unmask]>  wrote:
>>
>>> Playing devils advocate  here...
>>>
>>> Those grease pencil marks are an edit  decision.  I understand the
>>> desirability of removing the  contamination from the grooves from an 
>>> audio
>>>  perspective, but from an archival perspective how do you do that  and
>>> preserve a record of the fact that the creator or editor  thought the
>>> grease penciled material was a bad  take?
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>  Steve Greene
>>> Archivist
>>> Office of Presidential  Libraries
>>> National Archives and Records  Administration
>>> (301) 837-1772
>>>>>>  "Peoples, Curtis" <[log in to unmask]> 4/12/2013 10:57 AM  >>>
>>> I was watching American Restoration and they  talked about removing 
>>> grease
>>> pencil markings  from various objects and said the oil from you skin was
>>> the  best. Rick Dale demonstrated by wiping his finger on his forehead  
>>> and
>>> erasing grease pencil marking from a  piece of painted metal. It came 
off
>>> without any smearing.  Would there be a product comparable to "skin 
oil"?
>>> Will it  work on a disc? Soapy water will create a greasy mess.  
Solvents
>>> will probably damage the  disc.
>>>
>>>
>>> Curtis L. Peoples,  Ph.D.
>>> Associate Archivist, Crossroads Music  Archive,
>>> www.crossroadsofmusic.ttu.edu
>>> Unit  Head, Crossroads Recording Studio,
>>>  http://library.ttu.edu/crossroadsrecordingstudio/
>>> Director,  TTU Americana Ensemble,
>>>  http://ttuamericanaensemble.weebly.com/index.html
>>>
>>>  Contact Info:
>>> Southwest Collection, Texas Tech  University
>>> P. O. Box 41041
>>> Lubbock, Texas  79409-1041
>>> Email: [log in to unmask]
>>> TEL:  1+806-834-5777
>>> FAX:  1+806-742-0496
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>  -----Original Message-----
>>> From: Association for Recorded  Sound Discussion List
>>> [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On  Behalf Of Doug Pomeroy
>>> Sent: Friday, April 12, 2013 9:31  AM
>>> To: [log in to unmask]
>>> Subject:  [ARSCLIST] grease pencil removal
>>>
>>> I have never  experimented with various cleaning fluids to remove grease
>>>  pencil from shellac and lacquer discs.  Any  suggestions?
>>>
>>>
>>> Doug  Pomeroy
>>> Audio Restoration and Mastering  Services
>>> 193 Baltic St (Clinton/Henry)
>>>  Brooklyn, NY  11201-6173
>>> (718) 855-2650
>>>  [log in to unmask]
>