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An alarming trend (well, I consider it alarming) in newsprint is a lack 
of opinion pieces on artistic presentations. Writers surely find it far 
easier to issue publicity about events that are coming up than to write 
intelligent criticism of events that have just passed. Rewriting press 
releases from the artist, record company, their management, etc., before 
an event is not news. It's advertising.
Going a bit further, our fine upstanding local politacally-slanted 
newspaper hasn't had an opinion on anything in years. But they'll 
happily run the opinions of news writers from one national feed or 
another. I guess it's a matter of liability. When you're parroting other 
sources you are not personally liable for any opinion they may have and 
any blame, or lawsuits, attached can be shunted to the source.
Let's hear it for personal responsibility!
So, to answer your question, tomorrow's music critics have seemingly 
become ad scriveners, more's the pity.
Malcolm (descending from his soap-box)

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On 4/7/2013 10:16 AM, Karl Miller wrote:
> They are out of a job! if current trends continue...at least when it comes to
> classical music.
>
> Karl
>
>
> ----- Original Message ----
> From: Roger Kulp <[log in to unmask]>
> To: [log in to unmask]
> Sent: Sun, April 7, 2013 8:15:58 AM
> Subject: [ARSCLIST] Where Are  Tomorrow’s  Music Cri tics?
>
> http://www.symphonynow.org/2012/01/where-are-tomorrow%E2%80%99s-music-critics/
>