Print

Print


Phonocards are not really picture discs. I forgot about those 90-100 RPM Pathe records,with the advertising on the back. http://www.cooncreekrecords.com/EBAY/pathe.JPG Would they qualify as picture discs? Roger > Date: Tue, 9 Apr 2013 11:28:07 +0200> From: [log in to unmask]> Subject: [ARSCLIST] Picture discs> To: [log in to unmask]> > Picture discs can be made by using different materials: cardboard, > paper, shellac, plastic, glass, aluminum, vinyl, cellulose - that is to > say, just about any medium that can be used to reproduce grooved sounds.> The first 78rpm picture discs were made in Germany (and France) some 110 > years ago. They were printed picture postcards covered with a > transparent film into which the grooves were pressed. The story is > detailed on my website> http://www.lotz-verlag.de/Online-Disco-Phonocards.html> Just try the various links for images of the patent issued to Thomas in > 1904, and scans of specimen.> Similar technologies were revived in Germany during the 1920s for 10" > discs (I have test pressings).> The first 33rpm picture discs were manufactured by RCA Victor in March 1933> The Nazi records mentioned (including those featuring Hitler's portrait > or the swastica flag - I showed those at last year's Rochester ARSC > meeting when discussing the German record label book) were 20cm and 25cm > cardboad discs distributed by Nationaler Schallplattendienst from Berlin > for election campaigns in 1932.> Der Laut records mentioned also manufactured 30cm diameter picture disc, > also cardboad.> German manufacturers experimented with all sorts of carriers during that > period. For instance, Metallophon used a metal core from 1931, covered > with layers of cellulose ester.> The first microgroove picture discs were made in Germany during the mid > 1950s by BB-Schallplatten.> The picture disc technology was refined over the vinyl era, when they > were mostly made of five layers. "Two transparent sheets of plastic film > are placed in the mould of the press, one on the bottom, the other on > the top. A punched-out sheet of paper, printed on one side only, is then > placed over each of the sheets of film. The middle of the sandwich is > then filled with a layer of heated vinyl granulates. The layers are > fused together in the machine under heat and pressure" [Peter Bastine: > Extraordinary Records, Taschen, Cologne, 2009].> Rainer> > -- > Dr. Rainer E. Lotz> Rotdornweg 81> 53177 Bonn (Germany)> > Tel: 0049-228-352808> Fax: 0049-228-365142> Web: www.lotz-verlag.de