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Dbpedia probably allows for this, if the adaptations for the Jungle Book,
for example, are listed in the wikipedia article.

Ethan
On Apr 12, 2013 12:29 PM, "Michele R Combs" <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

>  Hello all --****
>
> ** **
>
> Does anyone know of a project or a prototype that allows the end user to
> display / discover / navigate relationships between a work and various
> expressions of that work?****
>
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>
> For example, let's say the work is Rudyard Kipling's *The Jungle Book*.
> Let's say that I have in my collection 20 editions of the book, in English
> and other languages; a videotape of the Disney movie; a complete run of the
> comic book series *Petit d'homme* ("Man Cub") which retells the stories
> in a futuristic post-apocalyptic setting; a copy of Neil Gaiman's *The
> Graveyard Book*, inspired by *The Jungle Book* and with many scenes that
> map directly to scenes in the original; a kids’ video game in which Mowgli
> and other characters from the book have adventures; the libretto + music
> from the Orlando Shakespeare Theater’s 2006 adaptation for their Theater
> For Young Audiences; a 33-1/3 LP recording of the *Jungle Book Cycle* by
> composer Percy Grainger; original sketches and drawings by [some famous
> artist] which the artist says were inspired by the book; a copy of a
> Stephen King novel which includes quotes from the book; a poetry anthology
> entitled *Jungle Rhymes* for which contributors wrote original poems
> about, or related to, or somehow connected to the book; a book of lit crit
> essays on various aspects of *The Jungle Book*; and lots more stuff.****
>
> ** **
>
> So, in this hypothetical system, there would be a record for the work: *The
> Jungle Book* by Rudyard Kipling, and there would be a record for each of
> these items.  There would also be relationships defined between the work
> and each of the items, including the nature of that relationship, for
> example “edition of” “adaptation of” “translation of” “is quoted in” and so
> on.  The end user could then look up a *work* and immediately see all the
> *items* related to that work, and also see exactly *how* they are related.
> ****
>
> ** **
>
> For those of you know FRBR, this is basically the FRBR model.  I’m
> wondering if anybody has mocked up or prototyped or (gasp!) implemented an
> * end-user interface* that makes those relationships visible to/navigable
> by the end user.****
>
> ** **
>
> I did google “FRBR prototypes”, of course :) and I found a good amount of
> stuff on back-end systems and algorithms for creating/maintaining this
> data, but not so much on what it would/could look like to the end user.  *
> ***
>
> ** **
>
> I did find this one: http://blazing-sunset-24.heroku.com  (may take
> several seconds to load).  Under "Genre" click on "Drama" and then look at
> the list of results (the first one is "Citizen Kane").   The work info is
> displayed first, followed by info about specific instantiations (or
> manifestations, I can't remember the right term).  This is still very
> linear and "list-y," though, whereas I think it would be fun to see
> something more graphic (info visualization rather than info list), and the
> type of relationship is not given, but it's still quite interesting.****
>
>
> Anyway, does anybody know of anything?****
>
> ** **
>
> Thanks --****
>
> ** **
>
> +++++++++++++++****
>
> Michele Combs****
>
> Lead Archivist****
>
> Special Collections Research Center****
>
> Syracuse University****
>
> 315-443-2081****
>
> [log in to unmask]   ****
>
> scrc.syr.edu ****
>
> library-blog.syr.edu/scrc****
>
> ** **
>
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>