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After looking more closely at the Wikipedia entry for the Jungle Book, I
see that the adaptations are listed in the Wikipedia article, but they have
not made the transition into the dbpedia RDF for the resource (
http://dbpedia.org/data/The_Jungle_Book.rdf).  Even if they did, I'm not
sure if the relationships would be described as granularly as with frbr
(translation, adaptation, edition).  If, however, it were possible to use
the frbr ontology within dbpedia, you could make these sorts of complex
queries through their SPARQL interface (http://dbpedia.org/sparql).

If you plug in the query:

PREFIX dbpprop: <http://dbpedia.org/property/>
PREFIX rdfs: <http://www.w3.org/2000/01/rdf-schema#>
select ?label where {
<http://dbpedia.org/resource/The_Jungle_Book> dbpprop:author ?author .
?author rdfs:label ?label
} LIMIT 100

You get something like http://bit.ly/Zm3avd : a list of all the labels for
Rudyard Kipling, who is designated as the author of the Jungle Book.

It's a pretty powerful system, but as I said, since the relationships
between the entity known as the Jungle Book and its related adaptations,
editions, etc. is not semantically recorded in dbpedia's RDF, it probably
won't be useful to you for your specific example.  However, you can
leverage the SPARQL endpoint to deliver additional context about
bibliographic works.

Ethan


On Fri, Apr 12, 2013 at 1:37 PM, Bowers, Kate A. <[log in to unmask]>wrote:

>  There's a FRBR display tool on the LOC web site:
> http://www.loc.gov/marc/marc-functional-analysis/tool.html
>
> It's not linked data, but it might form part of a tool that you could
> develop.
>
>
>
> Kate
>
> [log in to unmask]
>
>
>
>
>  ------------------------------
> *From:* Encoded Archival Description List [[log in to unmask]] on
> behalf of Michele R Combs [[log in to unmask]]
> *Sent:* Friday, April 12, 2013 12:29 PM
> *To:* [log in to unmask]
> *Subject:* [EAD] Linked data / FRBR question
>
>   Hello all --
>
>
>
> Does anyone know of a project or a prototype that allows the end user to
> display / discover / navigate relationships between a work and various
> expressions of that work?
>
>
>
> For example, let's say the work is Rudyard Kipling's *The Jungle Book*.
> Let's say that I have in my collection 20 editions of the book, in English
> and other languages; a videotape of the Disney movie; a complete run of the
> comic book series *Petit d'homme* ("Man Cub") which retells the stories
> in a futuristic post-apocalyptic setting; a copy of Neil Gaiman's *The
> Graveyard Book*, inspired by *The Jungle Book* and with many scenes that
> map directly to scenes in the original; a kids’ video game in which Mowgli
> and other characters from the book have adventures; the libretto + music
> from the Orlando Shakespeare Theater’s 2006 adaptation for their Theater
> For Young Audiences; a 33-1/3 LP recording of the *Jungle Book Cycle* by
> composer Percy Grainger; original sketches and drawings by [some famous
> artist] which the artist says were inspired by the book; a copy of a
> Stephen King novel which includes quotes from the book; a poetry anthology
> entitled *Jungle Rhymes* for which contributors wrote original poems
> about, or related to, or somehow connected to the book; a book of lit crit
> essays on various aspects of *The Jungle Book*; and lots more stuff.
>
>
>
> So, in this hypothetical system, there would be a record for the work: *The
> Jungle Book* by Rudyard Kipling, and there would be a record for each of
> these items.  There would also be relationships defined between the work
> and each of the items, including the nature of that relationship, for
> example “edition of” “adaptation of” “translation of” “is quoted in” and so
> on.  The end user could then look up a *work* and immediately see all the
> *items* related to that work, and also see exactly *how* they are related.
>
>
>
> For those of you know FRBR, this is basically the FRBR model.  I’m
> wondering if anybody has mocked up or prototyped or (gasp!) implemented an
> * end-user interface* that makes those relationships visible to/navigable
> by the end user.
>
>
>
> I did google “FRBR prototypes”, of course :) and I found a good amount of
> stuff on back-end systems and algorithms for creating/maintaining this
> data, but not so much on what it would/could look like to the end user.
>
>
>
> I did find this one: http://blazing-sunset-24.heroku.com  (may take
> several seconds to load).  Under "Genre" click on "Drama" and then look at
> the list of results (the first one is "Citizen Kane").   The work info is
> displayed first, followed by info about specific instantiations (or
> manifestations, I can't remember the right term).  This is still very
> linear and "list-y," though, whereas I think it would be fun to see
> something more graphic (info visualization rather than info list), and the
> type of relationship is not given, but it's still quite interesting.
>
>
> Anyway, does anybody know of anything?
>
>
>
> Thanks --
>
>
>
> +++++++++++++++
>
> Michele Combs
>
> Lead Archivist
>
> Special Collections Research Center
>
> Syracuse University
>
> 315-443-2081
>
> [log in to unmask]
>
> scrc.syr.edu
>
> library-blog.syr.edu/scrc
>
>
>
>
>