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I don't think they do, I believe it's undifferentiated. I'm not very
knowledgeable in this area though.

ARIA (Accessible Rich Internet Applications) is a new W3C specification for
making your stuff accessible via a standard set of DOM properties. It
allows you to add things like a "role" attribute to different HTML elements
to tell a reader how it should interpret something (like "here's a
navigation menu!"). Maybe not that relevant to what you're trying to do,
but something to keep an eye on for accessibility.


On Mon, Jun 10, 2013 at 4:41 PM, Michele R Combs <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

>  Hi Joyce –****
>
> ** **
>
> Thanks – I will definitely check it out.  When the output is interpreted
> by a screen reader, does it report the class attribute or in some other way
> reflect the nesting of the component levels?  Or does it just treat that
> third column as undifferentiated, i.e. all at the same “level”?****
>
> ** **
>
> Michele****
>
> ** **
>
> *From:* Encoded Archival Description List [mailto:[log in to unmask]] *On
> Behalf Of *Joyce Chapman
> *Sent:* Monday, June 10, 2013 3:03 PM
> *To:* [log in to unmask]
> *Subject:* Re: finding aid HTML and accessibility****
>
> ** **
>
> Hi Michelle,****
>
> ** **
>
> In 2009 I wrote a stylesheet like your first solution, partially in the
> hope that people would use it to alleviate this problem -- it's a good
> solution to getting rid of using the table to force indentation. It's part
> of the EADRT hosted stylesheets, called "dsc-3-column-table: three column
> table for DSC section" (
> http://saa-ead-roundtable.github.io/ead-stylesheets/). The stylesheet
> uses the first two columns to output container values (box 1, folder 1),
> and all descriptive info for nested components is output together in the
> third column. The layout of nested component levels is controlled through
> classes provided in an accompanying CSS stylesheet. It assumes that your
> institution uses two columns for container values, but you could easily
> modify it to be a two-column layout for single containers. The CSS does not
> include any styling other than setting up the classes that will control the
> display (such as indentation) for the different component levels' table
> cells.****
>
> ** **
>
> Joyce****
>
> ** **
>
> On Mon, Jun 10, 2013 at 12:51 PM, Michele R Combs <[log in to unmask]>
> wrote:****
>
> Hello, collective wisdom --
>
> I'm wondering what approaches people have taken to encoding finding aids
> for browser display in a manner that is useful to folks who access web
> pages through non-visual means (e.g., a screen reader).  I know that HTML
> tables (a) aren't supposed to be used for layout and (b) can pose problems
> for people using alternate means to "read" web pages, and the hierarchical
> nature of finding aid descriptions poses a sort of extra level of problem.
>
> Given this sort of data:
>
> Box     Folder  Contents
>                 Memorabilia
> 1       1               Awards
> 1       2               Citations
>                         Photographs
> 2       1                       Family
> 2       2                       Friends
> 2       3                       Travel
> 2       4               Scrapbooks
>
> how does one create HTML that is both good HTML and non-visually
> accessible/meaningful?
>
> Here are the approaches I've thought of so far:
>
> FIRST:  One could encode the entire box/folder listing as a simple
> 3-column table, with the columns being "box" "folder" and "contents." I
> could then assign a @class attribute to each <td> (e.g., class="level1"
> class="level2") and use CSS to indent "Awards" "Citations" "Friends" etc.
> to the appropriate level for the visual folks.  Technically this is
> probably the most correct in terms of HTML, since the data does consist
> only of three types: box, folder, and contents.  But would the class
> attribute be any use to the non-visual folks?  Is it recognized by screen
> readers, and would it be enough to convey the hierarchical information in a
> useful manner?
>
> SECOND:  One could do it as a multi-column table, putting the different
> levels into different columns (in the example above I'd need five columns:
> box, folder, c01, c02, c03) and spanning as necessary.  That (sort of)
> preserves the hierarchical nature of the information but it means there
> will be a bunch of extra columns, and I feel like this is using the table
> more for layout purposes than for actual tabular data.  Plus web-readers
> don't always do well with spanned columns - might just be a big mess -- and
> big tables can be slow to load in general.
>
> THIRD: One could use separate tables for each set/subset of boxes/folders,
> and include the full hierarchy as the table caption, e.g.:
>
> <p>Memorabilia</p>
> <table><caption>Memorabilia</caption>[box/folder list]</table>
>
> <p>Photographs</p>
> <table><caption>Memorabilia - Photographs</caption>[box/folder
> list]</table>
>
> But that poses problems when the list drops down to a lower level briefly
> and then comes back up (what do I do with "Scrapbooks" in his scenario,
> since the "Memorabilia" table is already closed above?  A separate table
> captioned "Memorabilia - continued"?)
>
> FOURTH:  And of course the final option would be to not use tables at all
> and instead use different heading levels (<h1> <h2> etc.) to indicate
> subordinate levels of description, same as in a page of regular text that
> has topics and sub-topics.
>
> Are there other approaches I've left out?  Does anyone have experience
> and/or thoughts on this?
>
> Michele
> +++++++++++++++
> Michele Combs
> Lead Archivist
> Special Collections Research Center
> Syracuse University
> 315-443-2081
> [log in to unmask]
> scrc.syr.edu
> library-blog.syr.edu/scrc****
>
>
>
> ****
>
> ** **
>
> -- ****
>
> Joyce Chapman****
>
> Communications and Data Analysis Consultant****
>
> State Library of North Carolina****
>
> 4640 Mail Service Center****
>
> Raleigh, NC 27699-4640****
>
> Phone: 919-807-7421 | Fax: 919-733-8748****
>
> [log in to unmask]<https://mail.nc.gov/owa/redir.aspx?C=6e03774f01464579a52f298db758e3c0&URL=mailto%3ajeffrey.hamilton%40ncdcr.gov>
> ****
>



-- 

Joyce Chapman

Communications and Data Analysis Consultant

State Library of North Carolina

4640 Mail Service Center

Raleigh, NC 27699-4640

Phone: 919-807-7421 | Fax: 919-733-8748

[log in to unmask]<https://mail.nc.gov/owa/redir.aspx?C=6e03774f01464579a52f298db758e3c0&URL=mailto%3ajeffrey.hamilton%40ncdcr.gov>