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The Library of Congress does wonderful work (and has a good press
operation!). Unfortunately, it sometimes seems that coypright holders are a
bigger constituency to them than the American public. Internationally since
GATT and the Uruguay Rounds, I suspect the balance has swung toward
restriction rather than availability of content. It's up to our elected
official to redress the imbalance. If we don't make our voices heard, the
copyright cartel certainly will.

Steve Greene
Audiovisual Archivist
Office of Presidential Libraries
National Archives and Records Administration
(301) 837-1772


On Tue, Jul 30, 2013 at 7:57 PM, Tom Fine <[log in to unmask]>wrote:

> http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-**18563_162-57596237/library-of-**
> congress-races-to-preserve-tv-**history/<http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-18563_162-57596237/library-of-congress-races-to-preserve-tv-history/>
>
> Question about one "fact" stated in the story, by an LOC employee -- there
> is really only one guy who works on the heads for Ampex 1" machines, and
> he's in his 80s? Also, where does all this mass digitization end up? Do the
> TV stations who expect the American taxpayer to preserve their video
> productions release the copyright? If so, when will this end up online so
> we all can enjoy it? I am especially concerned if public TV stations like
> the one mentioned in the piece (the producer of the program on Mississippi
> blues musicians, hosted by BB King) are not releasing copyright on their
> in-house productions. If the taxpayer is to pay for preserving these items,
> there should be universal access to them!
>
> -- Tom Fine
>