Print

Print


IMHO, there will always be a place, or always *should* be a place, for well chosen, intelligently presented radio programs of music. As long as we're honoring Dick Spottswood, everyone on this list should know that his weekly two hour program can be heard online and archived at 
http://bluegrasscountry.org/programs/the-dick-spottswood-show/2013-06-30-77967/ . It was relegated to one of WAMU's HD carriers for awhile, but can now be heard on old-school radio in the DC-Maryland areas on 105.5 and 93.5 FM.

Matthew Barton
Library of Congress

-----Original Message-----
From: Association for Recorded Sound Discussion List [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Tom Fine
Sent: Tuesday, July 02, 2013 2:10 PM
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] Folk Music in America

My bet is, the cycle will come around and the airwaves will matter. Perhaps not for broadcasting music, but the owners of the frequencies will get the last laugh.

What I can't understand is, given that we live in the age of streaming music, iPods, YouTube, Pandora, etc -- who CARES what's on the FM dial???

-- Tom Fine

----- Original Message -----
From: "Carl Pultz" <[log in to unmask]>
To: <[log in to unmask]>
Sent: Tuesday, July 02, 2013 12:41 PM
Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] Folk Music in America


> "C'mon guys, these are businesses."
>
> A-yup. And that's why today they hardly matter.
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Association for Recorded Sound Discussion List [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf 
> Of Steven Smolian
> Sent: Tuesday, July 02, 2013 11:08 AM
> To: [log in to unmask]
> Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] Folk Music in America
>
> The CD reduced the costs of operating a radio station considerably.  The drive to CD on classical 
> radio was convenience.  As with why libraries also ditched their records, minor scratches didn't' 
> t happen as often, equipment maintenance was much reduced including cleaning records, dealing with 
> needles and the whole record-playing ceremony.  CD content could be sent to and accessed from 
> servers.   Cataloging came with them. Engineering became simplified as did program administration- 
> no one had to time records anymore.  If a server was sued, no refilling was necessary.  C'mon 
> guys, these are businesses.
>
> Steve Smolian
>
>