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I was watching this great interview the other day,with Teo Macero.It was uploaded by Artist House Music.In one segment,he talks about how great records are often ruined by remastering for CD.I did not know Teo  had produced all of the first 200  Columbia stereo LPs,including the first stereo classical ones,as well as a bunch of the Bernstein/NYPO records into the early 60s.In the interview he talks about how Lenny called him one day to write a piece from West Side Story for him,and Teo refused to do it.There is almost two hours of interview here.There  is a LOT here about working with Miles,Monk,and Mingus,and how Teo created the records.Here's the segment about remastering.http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JvjWTOcoT3c  Roger > Date: Sun, 14 Jul 2013 11:39:20 -0400> From: [log in to unmask]> Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] Bass less reissues from England,U.S. Record club versions> To: [log in to unmask]> > "Some of this dark spirit seems to> have carried over into CD mastering."> > That's a brilliant observation.> > c> > > > On Sun, Jul 14, 2013 at 11:28 AM, Carl Pultz <[log in to unmask]> wrote:> > > That from a company that did fantastic work in their studios, and> > high-quality classical location recording. This echoes the situation with> > Columbia; often amazing productions were excessively compromised in disc> > mastering.> >> > What was it about the corporate cultures or shop floor realities in these> > American companies that caused this division? I've had the notion that in> > the early days, there was more unity of purpose, where all steps along the> > production chain were engaged in proving the quality of microgroove and> > stereo. Eventually, maybe because of the shear growth in volume of work or> > a> > sense of the mastering departments being second-class citizens in the> > engineering hierarchies, mastering became just overhead rather than an> > element in the creative process.> >> > If so, why or how did the English companies maintain a higher standard?> > Were> > they driven by different estimations of the demands of their market, or was> > it more something internal to the company cultures that supported better> > craftsmanship?> >> > There may be a historical element, too. Before tape, the lathe operator was> > a part of the session, right there with the artists. After, they were off> > in> > the back rooms, anonymous workers. Had to hurt if you started in the> > studios> > in 1940 and ended in the basement in 1980. Some of this dark spirit seems> > to> > have carried over into CD mastering.> >> > -----Original Message-----> > From: Association for Recorded Sound Discussion List> > [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Donald Clarke> > Sent: Sunday, July 14, 2013 8:09 AM> > To: [log in to unmask]> > Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] Bass less reissues from England,U.S. Record club> > versions> >> > On Jul 13, 2013, at 3:13 PM, Steven Smolian wrote:> >> > At one point I was working on a classical reissue project that had to be> > mastered, by contract, by the Capitol engineering staff in the U.S.  What I> > sent out and what I got back were quite different- less bass from Capitol> > and more compression.> >> > ============> >> > In 1989 I leased a classical recording made in 1970 from EMI in London for> > release on CD. There had been a digital transfer, issued on an Angel LP in> > the USA, but not on CD, and I asked EMI to find that so I wouldn't have to> > pay for a new transfer. They faxed Hollywood and back came a transfer of> > some old safety copy or something: unusable. They told me in London that no> > matter what they asked for from Capitol it was never right. We made a new> > transfer in the basement at Abbey Road.> >> > Donald Clarke> >