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The story I have seen a number of times was there was a rug merchant on the floor below the studio in Kingsway Hall,and the rugs absorbed the noise and vibrations of the underground  trains.Then the rug merchant moved,and... Thanks for clearing up the dates on the Landowska and Fischer recordings.That might be plausible.I was aware of the  Toscanini and Mengelberg mentioned,and yes,there are others. One of the most famous Phonobombs is the soda  machine on Elvis Presley's recording of "Blue Moon" Roger > -----Original Message-----> From: Malcolm Rockwell <[log in to unmask]>> To: ARSCLIST <[log in to unmask]>> Sent: Fri, Aug 2, 2013 2:26 pm> Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] Phonobomb examples?> > > Insect noises? Like termites munching his Bosendorfer?> I know of one instance where an artist dubbed in his dog barking quietly > at the beginning of a piece. he had flubbed the beginning, stopped, went > "Shhh... shh..." to the dog and began again. Very cute.> M> > *******> > On 8/2/2013 4:18 AM, Don Cox wrote:> > On 02/08/2013, Donald Clarke wrote:> >> >> Mitch Miller wanted Frank Sinatra to bark like a dog on one of his> >> later Columbia sides, but he wouldn't do it and Miller had to get> >> somebody else. A famous recording of Scheherezade by the Philadelphia> >> Orchestra, transferred from 78s for the new long-playing record in> >> 1948, had reverb added to it, using an old piece of tape that had a> >> barking dog on it, and you could hear that on the finished LP. And> >> there's a few live folk recordings made outdoors with barkers in the> >> chorus; I've heard one, but I don't remember what it was. There were> >> fiddlers playing "The Hot Canary", Leroy Anderson's "The Waltzing Cat"> >>> > Rudolf Serkin's version of the Diabelli Variations, recorded at his> > home, has insect noises in the background.> >> > There are many recordings from Kingsway Hall with audible tube trains.> >> > Regards> >