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Apparently the spirit of Boulton, Lomax, and Presto lives on!  

http://the78project.com/
"A journey across America to record today's musicians with authentic 1930's technology in a quest to connect with the haunting recordings of the past."

-----Original Message-----
From: Association for Recorded Sound Discussion List [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Jonathan Wise
Sent: August-22-13 1:00 PM
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] Laura Boulton

To add a few minor details to this interesting subject, Laura Boulton also collected material for a project entitled "Folk Songs of the Peoples of Canada" under the auspices of the National Film Board of Canada (ca.1941-1942). She worked closely with Marius Barbeau of the National Museum of Canada and John Grierson of the NFB. The project included 12 films on various cultural groups of Canada, folk-music and ethno-music recordings, and a proposed lecture series highlighting the films and recordings to audiences throughout the United States. Boulton made approximately 640 field recordings while directing the documentary films. Her index shows that most were recorded onto 10" discs at 78rpm, some were on 13" discs recorded at 33rpm. Some were recorded inside out and others outside in. We have a print of an NFB publicity photo of Boulton with a group of Quebec folksingers but unfortunately we can't see what the mic is plugged into. But as Matthew has mentioned she often used a Presto recorder. In fact, here in the archives I have 4 Presto long sapphire cutting needles still in their box that may, in retrospect, have belonged to her...



Jonathan Wise

Canadian Museum of Civilization



-----Original Message-----
From: Association for Recorded Sound Discussion List [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Barton, Matthew
Sent: August-22-13 9:20 AM
To: [log in to unmask]<mailto:[log in to unmask]>
Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] Laura Boulton



RCA only licensed these recordings for release. They had nothing to do with Boulton's original field recording expedition in 1934, which was largely financed by the philanthropist Sarah Lavanburg Straus, as in the "Straus West African Expedition" referenced on the cover of the album.



There are numerous references to Boulton using Presto equipment in her 1930s and 1940s fieldwork, though I haven't seen one that describes the 1934 expedition in particular that mentions Presto. She might cover it in her autobiography "The Music Hunter." Also, about ten years ago, Indiana University released a CD-ROM devoted to the 1934 fieldwork: "Music and Culture of West Africa: The Straus Expedition." Straus was the philanthropist Sarah Lavanburg Straus. There's more information here: http://www.indiana.edu/~rcapub/v21n3/p08.html. It seems like a pretty comprehensive package, and may include information or better photos of Boulton's recording gear.





Matthew Barton

Library of Congress





-----Original Message-----

From: Association for Recorded Sound Discussion List [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Roger Kulp

Sent: Wednesday, August 21, 2013 11:35 PM

To: [log in to unmask]<mailto:[log in to unmask]>

Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] Laura Boulton



RCA record equals RCA equipment. Roger > Date: Wed, 21 Aug 2013 00:28:42 -0400> From: [log in to unmask]<mailto:[log in to unmask]>> Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] Laura Boulton> To: [log in to unmask]<mailto:[log in to unmask]>> > Thanks for all of your hard work, Dr. B, in checking out that photo> and all of those fine leads to Laura Boulton images! I have known the> image of her from this album 40 years, but never thought to look for> another one with recording equipment. On the 1934 expedition that> produced this set alone she cut 464 discs. So I guess it wouldn't be> unusual for her to be seen with recording equipment!> > David N. Lewis> Cincinnati, OH