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My suggestion.  Don't use a noise gate or similar process.  Find a place in
the tape that is "silent" for a few seconds (nothing happening but has the
background sound of the space in which the recording was made) and copy it
to another file in your .wav editor.  Then substitute in patches from the
"silent" file, pasting over just the spots in the original that have
pre-echo, putting in the exact lengths to replace the parts you are pasting
over.  What happens after a note ends is harder, because you have to think
about the dying away of the note that just finished, if there is any hall
ambience in the recording.  You really don't want to use a gate on the
tones that are dying out, and you may or may not be able to substitute in
"silence."   You just have to work with it.

Best,
John Haley



On Wed, Oct 23, 2013 at 2:02 PM, Josh May <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> Hello ARSC,
>
> I'm new to the list, so please excuse me if this request is out of line.
>
> I'll get right to the crux: I'm working on a digital transfer from a 40
> year old 1/2" master audio tape. The recording is unaccompanied singing,
> and in the transfer I've noticed a very faint bleed-through / pre-echo that
> peaks at about -36 dB. The bleed-through is only minimally noticeable in
> the silence before or after a very loud note, but due to the dynamic nature
> of the recording, I've had trouble making a gate work and sound natural.
>
> So my question is, how could I correct or minimize this problem without
> affecting the original recording, if at all? I'm hoping there are some
> tricks out there I'm not familiar with.
>
> Thanks in advance for any and all help!
>
> Josh May
> June Appal Recordings
>