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Perhaps a smart phone with a line in for audio. I've seen hard/soft ware 
for making your smart phone into a flash recorder. One would need a drop 
down cable to convert a line audio feed to mic level. Never tried it 
myself, no reason to.

joe salerno


On 11/15/2013 5:51 AM, Tom Fine wrote:
> Attention people who know hardware and software developers ...
>
> Here's the market -- many people now do presentations "talking to
> slides." The only "video" that matters, typically, are the slides.
> Embedded media is sometimes used. Rarely, separate motion-video clips
> are run, but usually off the same computer. In the end, all of this is
> projected through a single house projection system, and the audio of the
> person speaking to their slides goes through a house PA system.
>
> The place to capture this live as at the house system. A device with a
> pass-through for audio and video is ideal, because then house people
> don't have to hassle with more cables, splitters, etc. The device should
> live between whatever switcher is feeding the projector, and between the
> audio mixer and the PA amplifiers. It should record to flash media or a
> hard drive, and record directly to some common web-video standard like
> MOV or AVI or Flash. Perhaps it can have a setting to record full
> uncompressed HD, but I doubt the switcher or projector are working in
> that mode to begin with.
>
> This could be accomplished in a little box no bigger than most audio
> flash recorders, or perhaps it could be a box that connects to an iPad
> or iPhone.
>
> Someone would make some $$$ on this if it were priced cheap and worked
> well.
>
> -- Tom Fine
>
> ----- Original Message ----- From: "Tom Fine" <[log in to unmask]>
> To: <[log in to unmask]>
> Sent: Friday, November 15, 2013 6:31 AM
> Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] "Slide-tape show" Software (was Public Library
> of Cincinnati Institutes Stream of Presentations)
>
>
>> All of this still requires post-production, which is what no one has
>> time to do. I'm so surprised there's no software to just record it all
>> live as it happens, audio feed and video feed, right out of the house
>> system, right on the house computer (or the recordist's laptop). Maybe
>> one of the Zoom or other recorders can take a DVI feed instead of
>> using the built-in camera? I supposed you could do this to a good
>> old-fashioned DVD recorder (using composite video instead of DVI), but
>> no one has those anymore.
>>
>> -- Tom Fine
>>
>> ----- Original Message ----- From: "Hugh Paterson III"
>> <[log in to unmask]>
>> To: <[log in to unmask]>
>> Sent: Friday, November 15, 2013 1:03 AM
>> Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] "Slide-tape show" Software (was Public Library
>> of Cincinnati Institutes Stream of Presentations)
>>
>>
>>> Back to the one of the early comments about software to create these
>>> kinds of presentations. I have used iMove. But one of the challenges
>>> I ran into when I tried to rotate photos fast to coincide with the
>>> music track was that iMovie could not switch the photos fast enough.
>>>
>>> This week I just watched a film by an internet acquaintance @Stammy
>>> on twitter.
>>> here is the film: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8fR4MjImSU0
>>>
>>> I was asking him about it and he said:  "it's not video, all photo
>>> stills. I just happen to take lots of similar photos to make sure i
>>> get a good shot. it was made using adobe after effects. imovie
>>> doesn't let you go faster than 0.1s per image still in a sequence"
>>>
>>> - Hugh
>>>
>>> On Nov 14, 2013, at 12:30 PM, Carl Pultz wrote:
>>>
>>>> Haven't had time to watch the whole thing, but I don't miss the
>>>> slides so
>>>> far. The info is interesting. It's like having Uncle Dave give a
>>>> talk at my
>>>> local library, which would be a delight.
>>>>
>>>> Lou's right. To pass on some advice, anytime you're dealing with
>>>> pictures,
>>>> you have to be aware of extraneous things that can become
>>>> distracting. Being
>>>> dark outside, the window is a nice background, but having the screen
>>>> there
>>>> messes it up. OTOH, the reflection might be worse. If the screen can
>>>> be to
>>>> the side and the room lights dimmed, it could be nice. Also, the camera
>>>> needs to be chest-level, not lower, and if possible placed farther
>>>> back with
>>>> the lens zoomed in to create the frame. That would minimize
>>>> distortion and
>>>> create a more flattering image. If sound is just from the camera,
>>>> you can't
>>>> get too far back, so compromise.
>>>>
>>>> I don't claim video editing as a professional skill, but I did the
>>>> developmental-editing of several classroom manuals for instructional
>>>> courses
>>>> on Premiere Pro. It was a blast. More than capable and intuitive in
>>>> concept.
>>>> By the mid-2000s it ran fine on ordinary PCs at lower than max
>>>> resolution.
>>>> I've also used Camtasia, which is similar but very much a 'lite'
>>>> product.
>>>> Could be all they'd need for what we're talking about, as could
>>>> Photostory.
>>>>
>>>> The vids below are purely of music, but show what minimal resources
>>>> can make
>>>> possible. My friend conductor David Chin has made some pretty decent
>>>> videos
>>>> of his concerts by using three stationary, un-operated camcorders,
>>>> edited
>>>> with the bundled Microsoft movie thing. I give him 48k sound files.
>>>> There's
>>>> no sync, but he lays the video over the sound and nudges the video
>>>> stems
>>>> into adequate sync as he creates the visual cuts, with the camera
>>>> audio as a
>>>> guide. The zoom effect is a feature of the software. Basic, but not too
>>>> shabby for a seat-of-the-pants amateur. Comparing the later vids to the
>>>> earlier, you can see how much of a difference better lighting makes.
>>>> Just
>>>> one Fresnel is all it took.
>>>>
>>>> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JkbeVudqE8Y#t=244
>>>>
>>>> http://www.davidchinmusic.com/conducting.html
>>>>
>>>> Carl
>>>
>>>
>>
>>
>

-- 
Joe Salerno