A press release from a FEDLINK Vendor- NewsBank- NB.

An interesting article, sidebar, about The Washington Star, newspaper archive from 1852-1981.

 

Jim Oliver

FEDLINK Vendor Services

[log in to unmask]

 

From: Readex [mailto:[log in to unmask]]
Sent: Wednesday, November 13, 2013 12:00 PM
To: Oliver, James
Subject: The Readex Report: November 2013

 

Forward to a Friend
Share:     Facebook    Twitter      
Can't view the images? Click here.

 

Hello James,

IN THIS ISSUE: A pensive primer on the teaching of history research classes, a mysterious presidential embargo exemption sparks envy and anger, and a gifted group of Chinese students succumbs to Western ways.



Librarians and History Instruction: Getting the Most Out of the One-shot Session
By Alexandra Simons, History, Political Science, and Government Documents Librarian, University of Houston

A recent discussion on H-HistBibl—the H-Net list for the Study and Practice of History Librarianship—asked two questions related to the American Historical Association’s Tuning Project: how do history subject librarians teach research classes, and what is the most accurate way to describe the nature of the activity, for example, information literacy or research methodology. Because I have been thinking about these questions myself and reading up on history instruction, I replied with insights based on my experiences over the past five years as the history, political science, and government documents librarian at my university. (continue reading)

Mr. Jefferson’s Mandarin, Or, a controversial promotion
By Dael Norwood, Bernard & Irene Schwartz Postdoctoral Fellow at the New-York Historical Society

When the ship Beaver departed New York harbor bound for the China coast in August 1808, the United States was fully embargoed. For over six months the country’s trade had been at a standstill, and all the ports idled. The livelihoods of America’s maritime workers had been sacrificed to the greater good by Jeffersonian Republicans, in the White House and the Congress, who hoped that an extreme form of commercial warfare—a wholesale ban on international trade—would force Great Britain and France to respect American neutrality without any shots fired. (continue reading)

Celestial Vision: China’s Scholars in the Connecticut Valley
By Barbara Shaffer, unofficial historian of Springfield, Massachusetts

In September 1872, Yung Wing escorted a delegation of young students from China to Springfield, Massachusetts, under the auspices of an unprecedented enterprise—the Chinese Educational Mission.  Wing’s all-male contingent attracted attention throughout the United States.  Rumors had circulated for months that in order to bring its isolated nation into the 19th century, the Chinese government would finance the American education of gifted children. (continue reading)


Click here to read this issue online.

Next Issue: February 2014

Have a suggestion? Interested in submitting an article? Please contact us by emailing The Readex Report Editor.

 

The Readex Report is published by Readex, a division of NewsBank, inc. Opinions expressed in this e-newsletter do not necessarily reflect the opinions of NewsBank, inc., its employees or divisions.

The Readex Report is a quarterly e-newsletter created to explore diverse aspects of digital historical collections through original articles by academic librarians, faculty and others. Readex also distributes news releases, special offers and invitations by email. Readex respects your privacy and will not share your information with third parties.

2013© Copyright NewsBank, inc. All rights reserved.
5801 Pelican Bay Boulevard, Suite 600, Naples, FL 34108.

To change your profile or signup for additional offerings, click here.
If you no longer wish to receive information by email from Readex, click here.

 

November 2013
Volume 8, Issue 4

   

 

What's New at Readex
Current highlights
>
Read more

 

American Pamphlets, Series 1, 1820-1922:
From the New-York Historical Society
>
Read more

 

Afro-Americana Imprints
One of the world's preeminent collections for African American studies
>
Read more

 

Washington Evening Star
An American Newspaper Archive
>
Read more