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You know, this explains why I thought it sounded quite good when it was on the edge of a conference 
table in the middle of a room.

-- Tom Fine

----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Louis Hone" <[log in to unmask]>
To: <[log in to unmask]>
Sent: Thursday, February 20, 2014 7:58 AM
Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] Computer desktop power speakers recommendation


> Bose has flooded the market with their TV ads and several friends bought
> the Wave system. They all complained that the bass was excessive. When I
> was at their respective homes, I noticed that their Bose was sitting in a
> corner of the room, either on a shelf or on a piece of furniture . Because
> of its shape, the Bose lends itself to that sort of installation. When I
> relocated the unit away from a corner, the bass went down 6 dBs which is to
> be expected due to the laws of physics and acoustics. Suddendly, the unit
> sounded fine like it was meant to be. Perharps Bose should include a guide
> for dummies warning them about corner installations.
>
> Louis
>
>
> 2014-02-20 6:46 GMT-05:00 Tom Fine <[log in to unmask]>:
>
>> I agree that describing sounds is an inexact thing. Say what you will
>> about audiophile writers like J. Gordon Holt, Harry Pearson and some of the
>> current bunch at Stereophile mag, they have come up with a language (mainly
>> invented by Holt and enhanced/evolved by Pearson) that describes sounds
>> heard and the behavior of audio equipment in transmitting sound.
>>
>> Regarding bass, "boomy" is a very common term, and what it seems to mean
>> is "too much upper bass (around the 150-200hz region) for the liking of the
>> person calling it boomy." Bose seems to get this reaction from a lot of
>> people, both those not used to much bass with their music (due to
>> tiny-speaker computer listening, or just consuming music via a laptop or
>> tablet, or being accustomed to TV speakers) and those who want deep bass
>> but hear too much higher bass with the Bose speakers.
>>
>> David, what do you think of the bass drum on the Fennell Telarc recording
>> of the Holst Suites? That's usually a strong "acid test". Also, do you have
>> that album made in Washington DC in the 80s by, I think, the US Air Force
>> Band? It's famous among audiophiles, in fact I just had it played for me by
>> one of the better-known LP advocates on a system that costs more than my
>> house and cars combined. I thought, lots of bass drum but I'm not sure the
>> music calls for that much bass drum. So is it musical or is it a woofer
>> reality test by design? If I recall correctly, the record was cut by Stan
>> Ricker, who knows his bass.
>>
>> One thing I do hear with modern recordings, especially those using
>> no-transformer recording chains, is that deep bass is sharper, more precise
>> and more focused if it's recorded well. I assume the reason is no phase
>> shifts from transformers. Some people really don't like that because it
>> definitely sounds different. LP fans often lodge a complaint about digital
>> bass that I think points to a similar situation -- all LP cutters have to
>> sum some portion of strong bass energy to the center in order to make
>> records trackable. A system with strong bass response and really
>> quick-reacting speakers in a decent room won't be "bass is non-directional"
>> to careful listeners. So someone who grew up with an LP and was accustomed
>> to its sound may not have had the double basses as clearly deliniated to
>> the right, or the electric bass in a Beatles recording actually panned
>> off-center like it often was in the later years (and in fact if they grew
>> up on the Capitol USA records, they didn't hear the bass as it sounded on
>> the approved UK masters). In some rooms, bass that is centered and slightly
>> high-passed, as is the case with many LPs, may work better because it
>> creates fewer frequency bumps around the sides of the speakers. Something
>> precisely placed and of the frequencies and balances of the master tape may
>> create a boom around or behind a speaker, or might sit wrong in the room,
>> or in some other way not sound "right", and the LP fan tends to blame this
>> on "digital" without looking at the differences in the media and the
>> playback systems.
>>
>> -- Tom Fine
>>
>> ----- Original Message ----- From: "DAVID BURNHAM" <[log in to unmask]>
>> To: <[log in to unmask]>
>> Sent: Thursday, February 20, 2014 3:52 AM
>> Subject: Re: [ARSCLIST] Computer desktop power speakers recommendation
>>
>>
>>  There is often a problem communicating with listeners who try to describe
>>> what they're hearing in non-audio subjective terms - warm, cold, dry, wet,
>>> tight, wooly, wooden, etc. and terms which are more appropriate like boomy,
>>> resonant, sizzly, thin, etc.
>>>
>>>
>>> When I use the term "boomy", it usually means a strong bass of a specific
>>> frequency - like the sound you hear when a car pulls up beside you with
>>> strong sub-woofers. Perhaps when the Bose Wave was introduced they still
>>> had some work to do to perfect the concept. After listening to the demo CD
>>> which is included with the Bose Wave, and which includes the double bass
>>> solo I mentioned previously which sounded convincingly like there was a
>>> double bass in the room, we listened to the entire "Nutcracker Ballet" by
>>> Tchaikovsky. If you know the music of Tchaikovsky, you know that he makes a
>>> lot of use of descending scales; the Pathétique Symphony is full of them
>>> and the tune of one of the waltzes towards the end of Nutcracker is nothing
>>> but a descending scale. I listened particularly to these passages to see if
>>> the bass range was even and it was very much so.
>>>
>>> A number of years ago, I purchased a CD on the Reference label of
>>> military band music and was really disturbed by the bass drum. This
>>> instrument should have no definite pitch at all but on this recording there
>>> was a very strong specific pitch and it made it sound like you had your
>>> head in the bass drum. I wrote a letter to the company pointing this out
>>> and comparing it to some of the fine Mercury recordings, (no pun intended),
>>> where the bass drum sounds as it should. I got a letter back from the
>>> company telling me that I could not communicate directly with the recording
>>> producer/engineer but that she had passed my message on to him, (a Doctor
>>> something or another, I've forgotten his name), who explained that I
>>> obviously am an inexperienced listener with inferior equipment. There was
>>> no point in pursuing the conversation any further.
>>>
>>> db
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> On Tuesday, February 18, 2014 10:58:16 PM, Paul Stamler <
>>> [log in to unmask]> wrote:
>>>
>>> Back when the Bose was introduced, my late mother bought one. After two
>>>
>>>> days she sent it back; she said the bass sounded too boomy.
>>>>
>>>> Peace,
>>>>
>>>> Paul
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>
>>>
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